UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C.  20549

FORM 10-K

  Annual Report under Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Act of 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2014
or
☐ Transition Report under Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
For the transition period of _____________to_______________
Commission file number:  0-2500111

Federated National Holding Company
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its Charter)

Florida
 
65-0248866
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No)
 
14050 N.W. 14th Street, Suite 180, Sunrise, Florida 33323
(Address of principal executive offices)      (Zip Code)
 
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code             800-293-2532

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act:
 
Title of Each Class
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share
NASDAQ Global Market
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act:
None

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  Yes ☐ No ☒

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.  Yes ☐ No ☒

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes☒ No ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has electronically submitted and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to submit and post such files).          Yes ☒ No ☐
 
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
 
Large accelerated filer ☐
Accelerated filer ☒
Non-accelerated filer  ☐
Smaller reporting company  ☐
 
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes☐ No ☒

The aggregate market value of the Registrant’s common stock held by non-affiliates was $265,407,621 on June 30, 2014, computed on the basis of the closing sale price of the Registrant’s common stock on that date.

As of March 10, 2015, the total number of common shares outstanding of Registrant's common stock was 14,155,256.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
 
None.
 


Federated National Holding Company
 
Table of Contents

PART I
 
3
     
ITEM 1
3
     
ITEM 1A
23
     
ITEM 1B
35
     
ITEM  2
35
     
ITEM 3
35
     
ITEM 4
35
     
PART II
 
36
     
ITEM 5
36
     
ITEM 6
39
     
ITEM 7
41
     
ITEM 7A
70
     
ITEM 8
71
     
ITEM 9
114
     
ITEM 9A
114
     
ITEM 9B
115
     
PART III
 
115
     
ITEM 10
115
     
ITEM 11
119
     
ITEM 12
126
     
ITEM 13
127
     
ITEM 14
127
     
PART IV
 
129
     
ITEM 15
129
     
SIGNATURES
133
 
- 2 -

Federated National Holding Company
 
PART I
 
CAUTIONARY NOTE ABOUT FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act. These statements are therefore entitled to the protection of the safe harbor provisions of these laws. These statements may be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “budget,” “contemplate,” “continue,” “could,” “envision,” “estimate,” “expect,” “forecast,” “guidance,” “indicate,” “intend,” “may,” “might,” “outlook,” “plan,” “possibly,” “potential,” “predict,” “probably,” “pro-forma,” “project,” “seek,” “should,” “target,” “will,” “would,” “will be,” “will continue” or the negative thereof  or other variations thereon or comparable terminology. We have based these forward-looking statements on our current expectations, assumptions, estimates and projections. While we believe these expectations, assumptions, estimates and projections are reasonable, such forward-looking statements are only predictions and involve a number of risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond our control. These and other important factors may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to differ materially from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. Management cautions that the forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K are not guarantees of future performance, and we cannot assume that such statements will be realized or the forward-looking events and circumstances will occur. Factors that might cause  such a difference include, without limitation, the risks and uncertainties discussed under “Risk Factors” in this Annual Form 10-K, and discussed from time to time in our reports filed with the SEC.

Given these risks and uncertainties, you are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements included or incorporated by reference into this Annual Form 10-K are made only as of the date hereof. We do not undertake and specifically decline any obligation to update any such statements or to publicly announce the results of any revisions to any such statements to reflect future events or developments.

ITEM 1
BUSINESS

GENERAL

Federated National Holding Company (“FNHC”, “Company”, “we”, “us”), formerly known as 21st Century Holding Company, is an insurance holding company that controls substantially all steps in the insurance underwriting, distribution and claims processes through our subsidiaries and our contractual relationships with our independent agents and general agents. We changed our name on September 11, 2012, pursuant to approval received at our annual shareholders’ meeting, from 21st Century Holding Company so that our parent company and other subsidiary companies’ names are consistent with our primary insurance subsidiary and the name under which we have been writing insurance for more than 23 years.

We are authorized to underwrite, and/or place through our wholly owned subsidiaries, homeowners’ multi-peril (“homeowners”), commercial general liability, federal flood, personal auto and various other lines of insurance in Florida and various other states. We market and distribute our own and third-party insurers’ products and our other services through a network of independent agents.

Our insurance subsidiary is Federated National Insurance Company (“FNIC”). FNIC is licensed as an admitted carrier in Florida. An admitted carrier is an insurance company that has received a license from the state department of insurance giving the company the authority to write specific lines of insurance in that state. These companies are also bound by rate and form regulations, and are strictly regulated to protect policyholders from a variety of illegal and unethical practices, including fraud. Admitted carriers are also required to financially contribute to the state guarantee fund, which is used to pay for losses if an insurance carrier becomes insolvent or unable to pay the losses due their policyholders. Through contractual relationships with a network of approximately 3,600 independent agents, of which approximately 2,300 actively sell and service our products, FNIC is authorized to underwrite homeowners’, commercial general liability, fire, allied lines and personal and commercial automobile insurance in Florida. FNIC is licensed as an admitted carrier in Alabama, Louisiana, Georgia and Texas and underwrites commercial general liability insurance in those states. FNIC also underwrites homeowners’ insurance in Louisiana and Alabama, commencing in October 2014. Additionally, we underwrite personal automobile insurance in Georgia and Texas.

FNIC is licensed as a non-admitted carrier in Missouri, Nevada and South Carolina and can underwrite commercial general liability insurance in all of these states. Currently, we do not have any operations in these states. A non-admitted carrier, sometimes referred to as an “excess and surplus lines” carrier, is permitted to do business in a state and, although it is strictly regulated to protect policyholders from a variety of illegal and unethical practices, including fraud, non-admitted carriers are subject to considerably less regulation with respect to policy rates and forms. Non-admitted carriers are not required to financially contribute to and benefit from the state guarantee fund, which is used to pay for losses if an insurance carrier becomes insolvent or unable to pay the losses due their policyholders.
 
- 3 -

Federated National Holding Company
 
We internally process claims made by our insureds through our wholly owned claims adjusting company, Federated National Adjusting, Inc. (“FNA”). Our agents have no authority to settle claims or otherwise exercise control over the claims process. Furthermore, we believe that the retention of independent adjusters, in addition to the employment of salaried claims personnel, results in reduced ultimate loss payments, lower Loss and loss adjustment expenses (“LAE”) and improved customer service for our claimants and policyholders. We also employ an in-house litigation management team to cost effectively manage claims-related litigation and to monitor our claims handling practices for efficiency and regulatory compliance.

During 2014, the Florida Office of Insurance Regulation (“Florida OIR”) approved an application to allow the claims administration operations of FNA to be assumed by FedNat Underwriters, Inc. (“FNU”), formerly known as Federated National Underwriters Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company. Under the amended managing general agency agreement between FNU and FNIC, FNU will provide the same claims administration services under the same fee structure. The combination of these services in FNU had no effect on consolidated net income.

FNU acts as FNIC’s exclusive managing general agent in Florida and is also licensed as a managing general agent in the States of Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, South Carolina and Texas. FNU has contracted with other unaffiliated insurance companies to sell personal umbrella through FNU’s existing network of agents.

FNU earns commissions and fees for providing policy administration, marketing, accounting and analytical services, and for participating in the negotiation of reinsurance contracts. FNU earns a per policy fee which ranges from $25 to $55 and a commission fee from its affiliate, FNIC, which totaled 4% during 2014. The Florida OIR periodically reviews our managing general agent’s fee structure to ensure that it is neither excessive nor inadequate to operate.

The homeowner policy provides FNU the right to cancel any policy within a period of 90 days from the policy's inception with 25 days’ notice, or after 90 days from policy inception with 95 days’ notice, even if the risk falls within our underwriting criteria.
 
Although we are authorized to underwrite the various lines described above, our business is primarily underwriting homeowners’ policies. During 2014, 91.4%, 3.3%, 2.0% and 3.3% of the premiums we underwrote were for homeowners’, commercial general liability, federal flood, and personal automobile insurance, respectively. During 2014, $39.6 million or 11.0% of the $344.9 million of homeowners’ premiums we underwrote were produced under an agency agreement with Ivantage Select Agency, Inc. (“ISA”), an affiliate of Allstate Insurance Company, that grants Allstate agents the authority to offer certain FNU products. The $39.6 million of homeowners’ premiums produced under this agreement with ISA represents 31.0% of the total increase in the sale of homeowners’ policies during 2014, compared with 2013. This network of agents began writing for FNIC in March 2013. During 2013, 89.6%, 4.3%, 2.6% and 3.5% of the premiums we underwrote were for homeowners’, commercial general liability, federal flood, and personal automobile insurance, respectively.
 
During the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 or 2012, we did not experience any weather-related catastrophic events such as the hurricanes that occurred in Florida during 2005 and 2004. We are not able to predict how hurricanes or other insurable events will affect our future results of operations and liquidity. Losses and LAE are affected by a number of factors, many of which are partially or entirely beyond our control, including the following.

· the nature and severity of the loss;
· weather-related patterns;
· the availability, cost and terms of reinsurance;
· underlying settlement costs, including medical and legal costs;
· legal and political factors such as legislative initiatives and public opinion;
· macroeconomic issues.

Our business, results of operations and financial condition are subject to fluctuations due to a variety of factors. Abnormally high severity or frequency of claims in any period could have a material adverse effect on us. When our estimated liabilities for unpaid losses and LAE are less than the actuarially determined amounts, we increase the expense in the current period. Conversely, when our estimated liabilities for unpaid losses and LAE are greater than the actuarially determined amounts, we decrease the expense in the current period.

We previously entered into a Coexistence Agreement effective August 30, 2013 (the “Coexistence Agreement”) with Federated Mutual Insurance Company (“Federated Mutual”) pursuant to which, among other things, we may continue to use “Federated” until at least August 30, 2020, after which time we have agreed to either cease using “Federated” in commerce or otherwise adopt and use trade names that are not confusingly similar to Federated Mutual’s trademarks.  We continue to develop our brand under the “FedNat” name, which is the name by which agents generally know us.
 
- 4 -

Federated National Holding Company
 
Our goal in our reinsurance strategy is to equalize the liquidity requirements imposed by most severe insurable events and by all other insurable events we manage in the normal course of business.  Please see “Reinsurance Agreements” under “Item 1.  Business” for a more detailed description of our reinsurance agreements and strategy.

Our executive offices are located at 14050 N.W. 14th Street, Suite 180, Sunrise, Florida 33323 and our telephone number is (800) 293-2532.
 
Our internet web site is www.FedNat.com for policy holders, agents and investors. Our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to such reports are available, free of charge, through our website as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file or furnish such material to the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Further, a copy of this annual report on Form 10-K is located at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, D.C. 20549. Information on the operation of the Public Reference Room can be obtained by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. The SEC maintains an internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding our filings at www.sec.gov.
 
RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

We sold 2,358,975 shares of our common stock in an August 6, 2014 capital raise offering, which represented approximately 17.0% of our outstanding shares of common stock on that date after giving effect to this offering.

BUSINESS STRATEGY

We expect that in 2015 we will capitalize on our operational efficiencies and business practices through:

· improved property analytical qualities such as a broader geographical dispersion of risks throughout the state of Florida and avoiding risks that do not yield an underwriting profit;

· continued territorial expansion of our homeowners’, commercial general liability and private passenger automobile insurance products into additional states;

· employing our business practices developed and used in Florida in our expansion to other selected states;

· maintaining a commitment to provide high quality customer service to our agents and insureds;

· expansion of our marketing efforts by retaining key personnel and implementing direct marketing technologies;

· offering attractive incentives to our agents to place a high volume of quality business with our companies;

· offering our employees continuing education classes appropriate to the respective discipline employed within this organization;

· assumption of existing risks from other carriers; and

· additional strategies that may include possible mergers, acquisitions and joint ventures or dispositions of assets, and development of procedures to improve claims history and mitigate losses from claims.

We expect that in 2015 these strategies have poised us to accelerate the 2014 results trajectory in 2015 and beyond. There can be no assurances, however, that any of the foregoing strategies will be developed or successfully implemented or, if implemented, that they will positively affect our results of operations.

INSURANCE OPERATIONS AND RELATED SERVICES

Overview of Premium Growth

Gross premiums written increased $133.8 million, or 55.0%, to $377.2 million for 2014, compared with $243.4 million for 2013.  Florida homeowners’ represents 94% and Texas private passenger automobile represents the remaining 6% of the increased premium volume. We believe that our growth in 2014 reflects management’s efforts over several years. Our success today reflects our goal to be an agent-friendly carrier that provides exceptional service. We have invested in our agent relationships and our staff, have created easy-to-use systems for the agent, and increased our relevance to the agents’ operations by providing insurance products that meet their market needs.
 
- 5 -

Federated National Holding Company

Our homeowner business contributed $126.6 million or 95.0% of the increased gross written premiums during the year ended December 31, 2014. This increase was the result of:

· policyholders continuing to renew their FNIC homeowners’ policy,

· a “flight to quality” in the market by agents who seek quality carriers to place their business, and

· supporting a marketing team dedicated to promoting the quality and quantity of products and services that we offer.

During 2014, approximately 88% of our policyholders renewed their Florida homeowner policies. We believe that high retention rate reflects the confidence that the policyholder and his agent have in our financial stability and strength and in our commitment to adjusting claims quickly and fairly.

Overview of Insurance Lines of Business

The following tables set forth the amount and percentages of our consolidated gross premiums written, premiums ceded to reinsurers and net premiums written by line of business for the periods indicated.

   
Years Ended December 31,
 
   
2014
   
2013
   
2012
 
   
Premium
   
Percent
   
Premium
   
Percent
   
Premium
   
Percent
 
   
(Dollars in Thousands)
 
Gross written premiums:
                       
Automobile
 
$
12,377
     
3.3
%
 
$
8,449
     
3.5
%
 
$
2,996
     
2.5
%
Federal Flood
   
7,408
     
2.0
%
   
6,213
     
2.6
%
   
5,293
     
4.4
%
Homeowners'
   
344,939
     
91.4
%
   
218,350
     
89.6
%
   
101,832
     
85.3
%
Commercial General Liability
   
12,432
     
3.3
%
   
10,362
     
4.3
%
   
9,338
     
7.8
%
Total gross written premiums
 
$
377,156
     
100.0
%
 
$
243,374
     
100.0
%
 
$
119,459
     
100.0
%
                                                 
Ceded premiums:
                                               
Automobile
 
$
9,300
     
4.6
%
 
$
6,337
     
7.7
%
 
$
2,021
     
4.0
%
Federal Flood
   
7,408
     
3.7
%
   
6,213
     
7.5
%
   
5,293
     
10.4
%
Homeowners'
   
184,766
     
91.4
%
   
69,721
     
84.3
%
   
43,331
     
84.7
%
Commercial General Liability
   
524
     
0.3
%
   
438
     
0.5
%
   
440
     
0.9
%
Total ceded premiums
 
$
201,998
     
100.0
%
 
$
82,709
     
100.0
%
 
$
51,085
     
100.0
%
                                                 
Net written premiums
                                               
Automobile
 
$
3,077
     
1.8
%
 
$
2,112
     
1.3
%
 
$
975
     
1.4
%
Federal Flood
   
-
     
0.0
%
   
-
     
0.0
%
   
-
     
0.0
%
Homeowners'
   
160,173
     
91.4
%
   
148,629
     
92.5
%
   
58,501
     
85.6
%
Commercial General Liability
   
11,908
     
6.8
%
   
9,924
     
6.2
%
   
8,898
     
13.0
%
Total net written premiums
 
$
175,158
     
100.0
%
 
$
160,665
     
100.0
%
 
$
68,374
     
100.0
%
 
- 6 -

Federated National Holding Company
 
Homeowners’ Property and Casualty Insurance

FNIC underwrites homeowners’ insurance in Florida, Alabama and Louisiana. Homeowners’ insurance generally protects an owner of real and personal property against covered causes of loss to that property. The number of Alabama and Louisiana homeowner policies in-force totaled approximately 150 and 4,685 at December 31, 2014, respectively. The table that follows reflects the number of Florida homeowner policies in-force by county and reflects our concentrations of risk from catastrophic events.

    In-Force Policy Count  
    Years Ended December 31,  
   
2014
   
2013
   
2012
 
County
 
Amount
   
Percentage
   
Amount
   
Percentage
   
Amount
   
Percentage
 
                     
Palm Beach
   
20,990
     
11.4
%
   
13,874
     
11.9
%
   
7,270
     
11.7
%
Brevard
   
13,993
     
7.7
%
   
8,947
     
7.7
%
   
4,508
     
7.4
%
Collier
   
12,723
     
7.0
%
   
7,420
     
6.4
%
   
3,422
     
5.6
%
Lee
   
9,958
     
5.5
%
   
6,870
     
5.9
%
   
5,175
     
8.5
%
Hillsborough
   
8,743
     
4.8
%
   
6,350
     
5.5
%
   
2,682
     
4.4
%
Pinellas
   
12,303
     
6.7
%
   
6,139
     
5.3
%
   
4,034
     
6.6
%
Broward
   
11,854
     
6.5
%
   
5,498
     
4.7
%
   
3,700
     
6.1
%
Saint Lucie
   
6,542
     
3.6
%
   
4,957
     
4.3
%
   
3,151
     
5.2
%
Indian River
   
6,291
     
3.4
%
   
4,704
     
4.0
%
   
2,436
     
4.0
%
Okaloosa
   
5,432
     
3.0
%
   
4,668
     
4.0
%
   
1,966
     
3.2
%
Martin
   
6,102
     
3.3
%
   
4,444
     
3.8
%
   
2,052
     
3.4
%
Orange
   
7,573
     
4.1
%
   
4,083
     
3.5
%
   
1,654
     
2.7
%
Sarasota
   
7,889
     
4.3
%
   
3,936
     
3.4
%
   
2,759
     
4.5
%
Charlotte
   
4,900
     
2.7
%
   
3,129
     
2.7
%
   
2,059
     
3.4
%
Escambia
   
3,877
     
2.1
%
   
3,038
     
2.6
%
   
1,227
     
2.0
%
Walton
   
3,403
     
1.9
%
   
3,021
     
2.6
%
   
1,210
     
2.0
%
Santa Rosa
   
3,581
     
2.0
%
   
2,939
     
2.5
%
   
1,305
     
2.1
%
Bay
   
3,763
     
2.1
%
   
2,785
     
2.4
%
   
792
     
1.3
%
Duval
   
3,396
     
1.9
%
   
2,249
     
1.9
%
   
911
     
1.5
%
Volusia
   
3,637
     
2.0
%
   
1,990
     
1.7
%
   
881
     
1.4
%
Miami-Dade
   
2,420
     
1.3
%
   
1,883
     
1.6
%
   
1,616
     
2.6
%
Manatee
   
4,435
     
2.4
%
   
1,859
     
1.6
%
   
1,560
     
2.6
%
Seminole
   
2,786
     
1.5
%
   
1,665
     
1.4
%
   
788
     
1.3
%
Saint Johns
   
2,687
     
1.5
%
   
1,639
     
1.4
%
   
547
     
0.9
%
Flagler
   
1,744
     
1.0
%
   
1,267
     
1.1
%
   
543
     
0.9
%
All others
   
11,535
     
6.3
%
   
7,047
     
6.1
%
   
2,854
     
4.7
%
Total
   
182,557
     
100.0
%
   
116,401
     
100.0
%
   
61,102
     
100.0
%
 
Our homeowner insurance products provide maximum dwelling coverage in the amount of approximately $3.8 million, with the aggregate maximum policy limit being approximately $6.2 million. We currently offer dwelling coverage “A” up to $4.0 million with an aggregate total insured value of $6.5 million. We continually subject these limits to review; during 2014 coverage “A” was increased by $1.0 million and total insured value increased by $1.5 million. The approximate average premium on the policies currently in-force is $1,840, as compared with $1,857 for 2013. The typical deductible is either $2,500 or $1,000 for non-hurricane-related claims and generally 2% of the coverage amount for the structure for hurricane-related claims.

Premium rates charged to our homeowner insurance policyholders are continually evaluated to assure that they meet the expectation that they are actuarially sound and produce a reasonable level of profit (neither excessive nor inadequate). Premium rates are regulated and approved by the Florida OIR. In 2014 our voluntary program rate study resulted in a rate decrease of 3% on our voluntary property book of homeowners’ business. In 2013 our voluntary program rate indications did not indicate the need for adjustment. In 2012 we were approved for a 4.8% and 0.9% rate increase on our voluntary property book of homeowners’ business.
 
- 7 -

Federated National Holding Company

Similarly, for the policies we assumed from Citizens Property Insurance Corporation (“Citizens”) in 2009, we received approval for a 14.8% increase in 2013 and a 14.1% rate increase in 2012.  There was no rate change in 2014. Our voluntary program was 99.0%, 97.7%, and 90.0% of the total homeowner program, for the years ending December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

For a further discussion regarding Homeowners’ Property and Casualty Insurance, see “Recent Developments”, above.

Commercial General Liability

We underwrite commercial general liability insurance for approximately 380 classes of artisan (excluding home-builders and developers) and mercantile trades (such as owners, landlords and tenants). The limits of liability range from $100,000 per occurrence with a $200,000 policy aggregate to $1.0 million per occurrence with a $2.0 million policy aggregate. We continually subject these limits to review, though there were no changes during 2014. We market the commercial general liability insurance products through independent agents and a limited number of general agencies unaffiliated with the Company. The average annual premium on policies currently in-force during 2014 is approximately $796, as compared with $773 in 2013.

The following table sets forth the amounts and percentages of our gross premiums written in connection with our commercial general liability program by state.

    Years Ended December 31,  
   
2014
   
2013
   
2012
 
   
Amount
   
Percentage
   
Amount
   
Percentage
   
Amount
   
Percentage
 
    (Dollars in Thousands)  
State
                       
Florida
 
$
11,401
     
91.71
%
 
$
9,572
     
92.37
%
 
$
8,639
     
92.52
%
Louisiana
   
98
     
0.79
%
   
150
     
1.45
%
   
217
     
2.32
%
Texas
   
756
     
6.08
%
   
547
     
5.28
%
   
426
     
4.56
%
Other
   
177
     
1.42
%
   
93
     
0.90
%
   
56
     
0.60
%
Total
 
$
12,432
     
100.00
%
 
$
10,362
     
100.00
%
 
$
9,338
     
100.00
%

Personal Automobile

Personal automobile insurance markets can be divided into two categories, standard automobile and nonstandard automobile. Standard personal automobile insurance is principally provided to insureds who present an average risk profile in terms of driving record, vehicle type and other factors. Nonstandard personal automobile insurance is principally provided to insureds that are unable to obtain standard insurance coverage because of their driving record, age, vehicle type or other factors, including market conditions. The average nonstandard personal automobile insurance policy currently in-force is approximately $1,056 for a six-month policy in Florida. The average nonstandard personal automobile insurance policy currently in-force in Texas is approximately $61 for a one-month policy,  $197 for a three-month policy, $372 for a six-month policy and $1,116 for a twelve-month policy. During the third quarter of 2014 we began to issue nonstandard personal automobile insurance policies in Georgia. The average nonstandard personal automobile insurance policy currently in-force in Georgia is approximately $466 for a six-month policy.

The maximum exposures for the nonstandard policy in Florida are $10,000 per individual, $20,000 per accident for bodily injury, $10,000 per accident for property damage, and predominantly $50,000 for comprehensive and collision. The maximum exposures for the nonstandard policy in Texas are $30,000 per individual, $60,000 per accident for bodily injury, $30,000 per accident for property damage, and predominantly $50,000 for comprehensive and collision. For our nonstandard personal automobile insurance in Georgia, the maximum exposures are $25,000 per individual, $50,000 per accident for bodily injury, $25,000 per accident for property damage, and predominantly $50,000 for comprehensive and collision.

Flood

FNIC writes flood insurance through the National Flood Insurance Program (“NFIP”) on a direct and ceded basis. We write the policy for the NFIP, which assumes 100% of the flood risk while we retain a commission for our service. The average flood policy premium is approximately $504 with limits up to $250,000. Commissions in connection with this program totaled $0.5 million, $0.4 million and $0.3 million in 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.
 
- 8 -

Federated National Holding Company
 
Managing General Agent Services

FNU, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company, acts as FNIC’s exclusive managing general agent in Florida and is also licensed as a managing general agent in the States of Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, South Carolina and Texas. FNU has also contracted with other unaffiliated insurance companies to sell personal umbrella policies through FNU’s existing network of agents.

FNU earns commissions and fees for providing policy administration, marketing, accounting and analytical services, and for participating in the negotiation of reinsurance contracts. FNU earns a per policy fee which ranges from $25 to $55  and a commission fee from its affiliate, FNIC, which totaled 4% during 2014. The Florida OIR periodically reviews our managing general agent’s fee structure to ensure that it is neither excessive nor inadequate to operate.

Claims Adjusting

We internally process claims made by our insureds through our wholly owned claims adjusting company, FNA. Our agents have no authority to settle claims or otherwise exercise control over the claims process. Furthermore, we believe that the retention of independent adjusters, in addition to the employment of salaried claims personnel, results in reduced ultimate loss payments, lower LAE and improved customer service for our claimants and policyholders. We also employ an in-house litigation management team to cost effectively manage claims-related litigation and to monitor our claims handling practices for efficiency and regulatory compliance.

During 2014, the Florida OIR approved an application to allow the claims administration operations of FNA to be assumed by FNU. Under the amended managing general agency agreement between FNU and FNIC, FNU will provide the same claims administration services under the same fee structure. The combination of these services in FNU had no effect on consolidated net income.

Direct Billing

The Company anticipates continued use of the direct bill feature associated with our homeowners’ and commercial general liability programs. Direct billing is when the insurance company accepts from the insured, as a receivable, a promise to pay the premium, as opposed to requiring payment of the full amount of the policy. The advantage of direct billing a policyholder by the insurance company is that we are not reliant on a credit facility, but remain able to charge and collect interest from the policyholder. Underwriting criteria are designed with down payment requirements and monthly payments that create policyholder equity in the insurance policy. The equity in the policy is collateral for the extension of credit to the insured.

Through our monitoring systems, we track delinquent payments and, in accordance with the terms of the extension of credit, cancel if payment is not made. If any excess premium remains after cancellation of the policy and deduction of applicable penalties, this excess is refunded to the policyholder. The direct bill program enables us to closely manage our risk while providing credit to our insureds.

Independent Insurance Agency

Insure-Link, Inc. (“Insure-Link”) is our independent insurance agency. The insurance agency markets direct to the public to provide a variety of insurance products and services to individual clients, as well as business clients, by offering a full line of insurance products including, but not limited to,  homeowners’, flood, personal and commercial automobile, commercial general liability and workers’ compensation insurance through their agency appointments with over thirty different carriers.

MARKETING AND DISTRIBUTION

We are focusing our marketing efforts on continuing to expand our distribution network while maintaining our commitment to long-term relationships. We market our products and services throughout Florida and in other states by establishing relationships with additional independent agents and general agents. There can be no assurance, however, that we will be able to obtain the required regulatory approvals to offer additional insurance products or expand into other states.

Our independent agents and general agents have the authority to sell and bind insurance coverage in accordance with procedures established by FNU. FNU reviews all coverage bound by the agents promptly and generally accepts all coverage that falls within stated underwriting criteria. For all policies issued, FNU also has the right, within a period that varies by state between 60 days and 120 days from a policy's inception, to cancel any policy, upon an advanced notice provided in accordance with statutory specific guidelines, even if the risk falls within our underwriting criteria.
 
- 9 -

Federated National Holding Company

We believe that our integrated computer systems, which allow for rapid automated premium quotation and policy issuance by our agents, is a key element in providing quality service to both our agents and insureds for various lines of our business.

We believe that the management of our distribution system now centers on our ability to capture and maintain relevant data by producing agents. We believe that information management of agent production, coupled with loss experience, will enable us to maximize profitability.

REINSURANCE AGREEMENTS

Financing risk generally involves a combination of risk retention and risk transfer techniques. “Retention”, similar to a deductible, involves financing losses by funds internally generated. “Transfer” involves the existence of a contractual arrangement designed to shift financial responsibility to another party in exchange for premium. Secondary to the primary risk-transfer agreements, we use reinsurance agreements to transfer a portion of the risks insured under our policies to other companies through the purchase of reinsurance. We utilize reinsurance to reduce exposure to catastrophic and non-catastrophic risks and to help manage the cost of capital. Reinsurance techniques are designed to lessen earnings volatility, improve shareholder return, and to support the required statutory surplus requirements. We also use reinsurance to realize an arbitrage of premium rates, benefit from the availability of our reinsurers’ expertise, and benefit from the management of a profitable portfolio of insureds by way of enhanced analytical capacities. Our primary property line that is subject to catastrophic reinsurance is Homeowners’ Multiple Peril. FNIC cedes these risks to domestic and foreign reinsurance participants from Bermuda and Europe as well as to the Florida Hurricane Catastrophe Fund (“FHCF”).

Quota share reinsurance is a pro rata agreement among the primary insurer and one or more reinsurers where each party shares a fixed and predetermined percentage of the program’s premiums and losses. Excess of loss risk transfer agreements involve the transfer of premium in exchange for reimbursement for claims, if they occur, as a result of specific events such as severe catastrophic weather. For quota share and excess of loss reinsurance, coverage is generally afforded based on meeting predetermined risk characteristics. In contrast, facultative reinsurance is negotiated between the primary insurer and the reinsurer(s) on a case-by-case basis with no obligation on either part to cede or assume share the risk.

Generally, there are three separate kinds of reinsurance structures – quota share, excess of loss, and facultative, each considered either proportional or non-proportional. Our reinsurance structures are maintained to protect our insurance subsidiary against the severity of losses on individual claims or unusually serious occurrences in which the frequency and or the severity of claims produce an aggregate extraordinary loss from catastrophic events. In addition to reinsurance agreements, we also from time to time enter into retro-cessionary reinsurance agreements; each designed to shift financial responsibility based on predefined conditions.

Although reinsurance does not discharge us from our primary obligation to pay for losses insured under the policies we issue, reinsurance does make the assuming reinsurer liable to the insurance subsidiary for the reinsured portion of the risk. A credit risk exposure exists with respect to ceded losses to the extent that any reinsurer is unable or unwilling to meet the obligations assumed under the reinsurance contracts. The collectability of reinsurance is subject to the solvency of the reinsurers, interpretation of contract language and other factors. A reinsurer's insolvency or inability to make payments under the terms of a reinsurance contract could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. Our reinsurance structure has significant risks, including the fact that the FHCF may not be able to raise sufficient money to pay its claims or impair its ability to pay its claims in a timely manner. This could result in significant financial, legal and operational challenges to all property and casualty companies associated with FHCF, including our company.

The availability and costs associated with the acquisition of reinsurance will vary year to year. These fluctuations, which can be significant, are not subject to our control and may limit our ability to purchase adequate coverage. For example, FHCF continues to restrict its reinsurance capacity and is expected to continue constricting capacity for future seasons. This gradual restriction is requiring us to replace that capacity with private market reinsurance. Our reinsurance program is subject to approval by the Florida OIR and review by Demotech, Inc. (“Demotech”). The recovery of increased reinsurance costs through rate action is not immediate and cannot be presumed and is subject to Florida OIR approval.
 
- 10 -

Federated National Holding Company

For the 2014–2015 hurricane season, the excess of loss and FHCF treaties insured the property lines for approximately $1.49 billion of aggregate catastrophic losses and LAE with a maximum single event coverage totaling approximately $1.01 billion, with the Company retaining the first $11.20 million in Florida and $3.0 million in Louisiana for losses and LAE from each event. Florida risks represent 98.5%, or $1.46 billion of the $1.49 billion of total aggregate catastrophic losses and LAE. The reinsurance program includes coverage purchased from the private market, which affords optional reinstatement premium protection that provides coverage beyond the first event, along with any remaining coverage from the FHCF. The FHCF only affords coverage for losses sustained in Florida. Coverage afforded by the FHCF totals approximately $546.3 million, or 37.4% of Florida’s $1.46 billion of aggregate catastrophic losses and LAE. The FHCF affords coverage for the entire season, subject to maximum payouts, without regard to any particular insurable event.

The estimated cost to the Company for the excess of loss reinsurance products for the 2014–2015 hurricane season, inclusive of approximately $40.20 million payable to the FHCF and the prepaid automatic premium reinstatement protection, is approximately $117.0 million.

Included in this year’s program is a 30% quota share reinsurance treaty for the Company’s in-force new and renewal homeowners’ insurance program in the State of Florida. This two-year quota share reinsurance treaty provides 30% of $200 million of aggregate catastrophe coverage per year with maximum single event coverage of 30% of $100 million per year. The approximate cost of this quota share is projected to be $6.7 million per year, net of ceding commissions, and it is included in the $117.0 million amount referenced above. The quota share treaty contains commutation provisions for the Company to share profits based on loss experience during the term of the treaty.

The 30% quota share reinsurance treaty described above contains profit sharing provisions that will adjust over its two-year term depending on the Company’s loss experience from catastrophic and non-catastrophic events during the term. The frequency and severity of catastrophic events, coupled with non-catastrophic loss experience, will determine the ultimate profit share, if any. In accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (“GAAP”), the Company will initially recognize an asset and liability and the resultant net income or loss. For example, deferred quota-share profit sharing totaled $10.5 million as of December 31, 2014. The deferred quota-share profit sharing was originally recorded at $14.0 million at the program’s July 1, 2014 inception and will continue to amortize over the life of the program. Subsequently, the Company will adjust the value of the asset and liability based on information available at the time of valuation. Upward and downward adjustments to the asset’s value will affect the Company’s results of operations by increasing or decreasing net income in the period of the adjustment.
 
- 11 -

Federated National Holding Company

The 2014-2015 private reinsurance companies and their respective A.M. Best Company (“A.M. Best”) and Standard and Poor’s (“S&P”) ratings are listed in the table as follows.

Reinsurer
A.M. Best Rating
 
S&P Rating
 
 
       
 
 
UNITED STATES
       
 
 
American Agricultural Insurance Company
A-
     
NR
 
American Standard Insurance Company of Wisconsin
A
     
NR
 
AIG (National Union Fire Insurance Company of Pittsburgh, PA)
A
     
A+
 
Everest Reinsurance Company
A+
     
A+
 
Odyssey Reinsurance Company
A
     
A-
 
QBE Reinsurance Corporation
A
     
A+
 
RLI Insurance Company
A+
     
A+
 
Transatlantic Reinsurance Company
A
     
A+
 
 
       
 
 
BERMUDA
       
 
 
ACE Tempest Reinsurance Limited
A++
     
AA-
 
Allied World Assurance Company, Limited
A
     
A
 
Arch Reinsurance Limited
A+
     
A+
 
Argo Reinsurance Limited
A
     
NR
 
Ariel Reinsurance Bermuda Ltd for and on Behalf of Ariel Syndicate 1910 (ARE)
A-
     
A+
 
Aspen Bermuda Limited
A
     
A
 
AXIS Specialty Limited
A+
     
A+
 
BGS Services (Bermuda) Limited/Lloyds Syndicate 2987
A
     
A+
 
DaVinci Reinsurance Ltd
A
     
AA-
 
Endurance Specialty Insurance Limited
A
     
A
 
Hamilton Re, Limited
A-
     
NR
 
Hiscox Insurance Company (Bermuda) Limited
A
     
NR
 
Partner Reinsurance Company Limited
A+
     
A+
 
Platinum Underwriters Bermuda Limited
A
     
A-
 
Renaissance Reinsurance, Limited
A+
     
AA-
 
Securis Re III Limited Bermuda
NR
*
 
**
NR
 
Securis Re IV Limited Bermuda
NR
*
 
**
NR
 
Tokio Millennium Re AG, Bermuda Branch
A++
     
AA-
 
XL RE Limited
A
     
A+
 
 
       
 
 
UNITED KINGDOM
       
 
 
A.F. Beazley Syndicate No. 623 (AFB)
A
     
A+
 
A.F. Beazley Syndicate No. 2623 (AFB)
A
     
A+
 
Amlin Syndicate No. 2001 (AML)
A
     
A+
 
Antares Syndicate No. 1274 (AUL)
A
     
A+
 
Ariel Syndicate No. 1910 (ARE)
A
     
A+
 
ARK Syndicate No. 4020 (ARK)
A
     
A+
 
Ascot Syndicate No. 1414 (ASC)
A
     
A+
 
Barbican Syndication No. 1955 (BAR)
A
     
A+
 
Canopius Syndicate No. 958 (CNP)
A
     
A+
 
Canopius Syndicate No. 4444 (CNP)
A
     
A+
 
Cathederal Syndicate No. 2010 (MMX)
A
     
A+
 
Chaucer Syndicate No. 1084 (CSL)
A
     
A+
 
Dale Underwriting Syndicate No. 1729 (DUW)
A
     
A+
 
Faraday Syndicate No. 435 (FDY)
A
     
A+
 
Hiscox Syndicate No. 0033 (HIS)
A
     
A+
 
Kiln Syndicate No. 510 (KLN)
A
     
A+
 
Liberty Syndicates Services Limited, Paris for and on behalf of Lloyd's Syndicate No. 4472 (LIB)
A
     
A+
 
MAP Underwriting Syndicate No. 2791 (MAP)
A
     
A+
 
MAP Underwriting Syndicate No. 2791 (Parallel) (MAP)
A
     
A+
 
Novae Syndicate No. 2007 (NVA)
A
     
A+
 
S.J.O, Catlin & Others No. 2003 (SJC)
A
     
A+
 
 
       
 
 
EUROPE
       
 
 
Amlin AG, Switzerland, Bermuda Branch
A
     
A
 
Hannover Rueck SE (obo Pillar Capital Management)
NR
*
 
**
NR
 
Lansforsakringar Sak Forsakringsaktiebolag (publ)
NR
     
A
 
SCOR Global P&C SE, Paris, Zurich Branch
A
     
A
 
 
       
 
 
ASIA
       
 
 
China Reinsurance (Group) Corporation
A
     
NR
 
Qatar Reinsurance Company LLC
A
     
A
 
 
       
 
 
* Reinstatement Premium Protection Program Participants
 
       
 
 
** Participant will fund a trust agreement for their exposure with cash and U.S. Government obligations of American institutions at fair market value.
 
- 12 -

Federated National Holding Company
 
For the 2013–2014 hurricane season, the excess of loss and FHCF treaties insured the property lines for approximately $562.7 million of aggregate catastrophic losses and LAE with a maximum single event coverage totaling approximately $420.4 million, with the Company retaining the first $7.0 million of losses and LAE for each event. The reinsurance program includes coverage purchased from the private market, which affords optional reinstatement premium protection that provides coverage beyond the first event, along with any remaining coverage from the FHCF. Coverage afforded by the FHCF totals approximately $278.1 million, or 49.4% of the $562.7 million of aggregate catastrophic losses and LAE. The FHCF affords coverage for the entire season, subject to maximum payouts, without regard to any particular insurable event.

The estimated cost to the Company for the excess of loss reinsurance products for the 2013-2014 hurricane season, inclusive of approximately $21.7 million payable to the FHCF and the prepaid automatic premium reinstatement protection, is approximately $67.9 million.

The 2013-2014 private reinsurance companies and their respective A.M. Best and S&P ratings are listed in the table as follows.
 
Reinsurer
A.M. Best Rating
 
S&P Rating
 
           
 
 
UNITED STATES
         
 
 
American Agricultural Insurance Company
 
A-
     
NR
 
Everest Reinsurance Company
 
A+
     
A+
 
Houston Casualty Company, UK Branch
 
A
     
A+
 
Odyssey Reinsurance Company
 
A
     
A-
 
           
 
 
BERMUDA
         
 
 
ACE Tempest Reinsurance Limited
 
A+
     
AA-
 
Allied World Assurance Company Limited, Bermuda
 
A
     
A
 
Arch Reinsurance Limited
 
A+
     
A+
 
Argo Reinsurance Limited
 
A
     
NR
 
Ariel Reinsurance Bermuda Ltd for and on Behalf of Ariel Syndicate 1910 (ARE)
 
A-
     
NR
 
DaVinci Reinsurance Ltd
 
A
     
A+
 
Endurance Specialty Insurance Limited
 
A
     
A
 
JC Re Ltd. (aka Pillar Capital and fka Juniperus & Actua Re Ltd.)
 
NR
*
 
**
NR
 
Partner Reinsurance Company Limited
 
A+
     
A+
 
Platinum Underwriters Bermuda Limited
 
A
     
A-
 
Renaissance Reinsurance Ltd
 
A+
     
AA-
 
S.A.C. Re, Ltd.
 
A-
     
NR
 
XL Re Limited
 
A
     
A
 
           
 
 
UNITED KINGDOM
         
 
 
A.F. Beazley Syndicate No. 623 (AFB)
 
A
     
A+
 
A.F. Beazley Syndicate No. 2623 (AFB)
 
A
     
A+
 
Amlin Syndicate No. 2001 (AML)
 
A
     
A+
 
Ariel Syndicate No. 1910 (ARE)
 
A
     
A+
 
ARK Syndicate No. 3902 (NOA)
 
A
     
A+
 
Ascot Syndicate No. 1414 (ASC)
 
A
     
A+
 
Barbican Syndication No. 1955 (BAR)
 
A
     
A+
 
Canopius Syndicate No. 958 (CNP)
 
A
     
A+
 
Canopius Syndicate No. 4444 (CNP)
 
A
     
A+
 
Cathederal Syndicate No. 2010 (MMX)
 
A
     
A+
 
Kiln Syndicate No. 510 (KLN)
 
A
     
A+
 
Liberty Syndicates Services Limited, Paris for and on behalf of Lloyd's Syndicate  No. 4472 (LIB)
 
NR
     
A+
 
MAP Underwriting Syndicate No. 2791 (MAP)
 
A
     
A+
 
MAP Underwriting Syndicate No. 2791 (Parallel) (MAP)
 
A
     
A+
 
Novae Syndicate No. 2007 (NVA)
 
A
     
A+
 
Pembroke Syndicate No. 4000 (PEM)
 
A
     
A+
 
Tokio Marine Kiln Syndicate No. 1880 (TMK)
 
A
     
A+
 
           
 
 
EUROPE
         
 
 
Amlin Bermuda (Branch of Amlin AG)
 
A
     
A
 
SCOR Global P&C SE
 
A
     
A
 
           
 
 
* Reinstatement Premium Protection Program Participants
 
         
 
 
** Participant will fund a trust agreement for their exposure with cash and U.S. Government obligations of American institutions at fair market value.
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
- 13 -

Federated National Holding Company
 
Annually, the cost and amounts of reinsurance are based on management's analysis of FNIC's exposure to catastrophic risk as of June 30 and estimated to September 30. Our data is then subjected to actual exposure level analysis as of September 30. This analysis of our exposure level in relation to the total exposures to the FHCF and excess of loss treaties may produce changes in limits and reinsurance premiums as a result of the reconciliation of estimated to actual exposure level. The September 30, 2014 change to total insured value was an increase of $5.4 billion or 8.2% and the change to reinsurance premiums was an increase of $0.4 million. The September 30, 2013 change to total insured value was an increase of $8.7 billion or 25.3% and the change to reinsurance premiums was an increase of $8.3 million or 13.3%.These adjustments are amortized over the remaining underlying policy term.

To date, we have made no claims asserted against our reinsurers in connection with the 2014–2015 and 2013–2014 excess of loss and FHCF treaties.

The quota share retrocessionaire reinsurance agreements require FNIC to securitize credit, regulatory and business risk. Fully funded trust agreements totaled $4.9 million as of December 31, 2014 and 2013.

We are selective in choosing reinsurers and consider numerous factors, the most important of which are the financial stability of the reinsurer, its history of responding to claims and its overall reputation. In an effort to minimize our exposure to the insolvency of a reinsurer, we evaluate the acceptability and review the financial condition of the reinsurer at least annually.

FNIC entered into Commutation, Settlement and Release Agreements (“CSR”) effective December 31, 2014. The underlying reinsurance treaties covering Florida private passenger automobiles were for a term from November 1, 2001 to December 31, 2003. As of December 31, 2014, there were no unearned premiums, direct loss or loss adjustment expense reserves and the ceded reinsurance recoverable totaled approximately $12,000 was received in January 2015. The agreement to commute had no effect on current year operations. Under the terms of the CSR, each party agreed to fully and finally release and commute all rights, obligations and liabilities, both known and unknown, for both parties pertaining to these agreements.

LIABILITY FOR UNPAID LOSSES AND LAE

We are directly liable for losses and LAE payments under the terms of the insurance policies that we write. In many cases, there may be a time lag between the occurrence and reporting of an insured loss and our payment of that loss. As required by insurance regulations and accounting rules, we reflect the liability for the ultimate payment of all incurred losses and LAE by establishing a liability for those unpaid losses and LAE for both reported and unreported claims, which represent estimates of future amounts needed to pay claims and related expenses.

When a claim, other than personal automobile, involving a probable loss is reported, we establish a liability for the estimated amount of our ultimate losses and LAE payments. The estimate of the amount of the ultimate loss is based upon such factors as the type of loss, jurisdiction of the occurrence, knowledge of the circumstances surrounding the claim, severity of injury or damage, potential for ultimate exposure, estimate of liability on the part of the insured, past experience with similar claims and the applicable policy provisions.

All newly reported claims received with respect to personal automobile policies are set up with an initial average liability. The average liability for these claims is determined by dividing the number of reported claims into the total amount paid during the same period. If a claim is open more than 45 days, that open case liability is evaluated and the liability is adjusted upward or downward according to the facts and circumstances of that particular claim.

In addition, management provides for a liability on an aggregate basis to provide for incurred but not yet reported (“IBNR”). We utilize independent actuaries to help establish liability for unpaid losses and LAE. We do not discount the liability for unpaid losses and LAE for financial statement purposes.

The estimates of the liability for unpaid losses and LAE are subject to the effect of trends in claims severity and frequency and are continually reviewed. As part of this process, we review historical data and consider various factors, including known and anticipated legal developments, inflation and economic conditions. As experience develops and other data become available, these estimates are revised, as required, resulting in increases or decreases to the existing liability for unpaid losses and LAE. Adjustments are reflected in results of operations in the period in which they are made and the liabilities may deviate substantially from prior estimates.
 
- 14 -

Federated National Holding Company
 
Among our classes of insurance, the automobile and homeowners’ liability claims historically tend to have longer time lapses between the occurrence of the event, the reporting of the claim and the final settlement, than do automobile physical damage and homeowners’ property claims. These liability claims often involve parties filing suit and therefore may result in litigation. By comparison, property damage claims tend to be reported in a relatively shorter period of time and settled in a shorter time frame with less occurrence of litigation.

There can be no assurance that our liability for unpaid losses and LAE will be adequate to cover actual losses. If our liability for unpaid losses and LAE proves to be inadequate, we will be required to increase the liability with a corresponding reduction in our net income in the period in which the deficiency is identified. Future loss experience substantially in excess of established liability for unpaid losses and LAE could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

The following table sets forth a reconciliation of beginning and ending liability for unpaid losses and LAE as shown in our consolidated financial statements for the periods indicated.

   
Period Ending
 
   
December 31, 2014
   
December 31, 2013
   
December 31, 2012
 
   
(Dollars in Thousands)
 
             
Balance at January 1
 
$
61,016
   
$
49,908
   
$
59,983
 
Less reinsurance recoverables
   
(2,742
)
   
(3,503
)
   
(2,088
)
Net balance at January 1
 
$
58,274
   
$
46,405
   
$
57,895
 
                         
Incurred related to
                       
Current year
 
$
79,932
   
$
56,209
   
$
31,636
 
Prior years
   
1,104
     
201
     
(1,427
)
Total incurred
 
$
81,036
   
$
56,410
   
$
30,209
 
                         
Paid related to
                       
Current year
 
$
42,391
   
$
22,695
   
$
15,892
 
Prior years
   
31,123
     
21,846
     
25,807
 
Total paid
 
$
73,514
   
$
44,541
   
$
41,699
 
                         
Net balance at period end
 
$
65,796
   
$
58,274
   
$
46,405
 
Plus reinsurance recoverables
   
12,534
     
2,742
     
3,503
 
Balance as of period end
 
$
78,330
   
$
61,016
   
$
49,908
 
 
As shown above, and as a result of review of liability for losses and LAE, which includes a re-evaluation of the adequacy of reserve levels for prior year’s claims, we increased the liability for losses and LAE for claims occurring in prior years by $1.1 million and $0.2 million for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013 and decreased the liability for losses and LAE for claims occurring in prior years by $1.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2012.

The liability for losses and LAE increased by $18.4 million and $1.4 million for our homeowners’ and commercial general liability lines, and decreased by $2.5 million for our automobile line, respectively, during 2014. These changes are due to management's continued efforts to manage the claims life cycle more efficiently. Additionally, our underwriting processes are designed to quickly gather the true primary and secondary risk characteristics and provide a profitable quote to the policyholder. This approach helps to reduce the overall frequency and severity of the loss portfolio.

Based upon discussions with our independent actuarial consultants and their statements of opinion on losses and LAE, we believe that the liability for unpaid losses and LAE is currently adequate to cover all claims and related expenses which may arise from incidents reported and IBNR as of December 31, 2014. There can be no assurance concerning future adjustments of reserves, positive or negative, for claims incurred through December 31, 2014.
 
- 15 -

Federated National Holding Company
 
The following table presents total unpaid losses and LAE, net, and total reinsurance recoverable due from our catastrophic reinsurers as shown in our consolidated financial statements.

   
As of December 31,
 
   
2014
   
2013
 
   
(Dollars in Thousands)
 
Catastrophe Excess of Loss (various participants) and FHCF
       
Reinsurance recoverable on paid losses and LAE
 
$
5
   
$
29
 
Unpaid losses and LAE
   
3
     
25
 
   
$
8
   
$
54
 
                 
Amounts due from (to) reinsurers consisted of amounts related to:
               
Unpaid losses and LAE
 
$
3
   
$
25
 
Reinsurance recoverable on paid LAE
   
5
     
29
 
   
$
8
   
$
54
 
 
- 16 -

Federated National Holding Company
 
The following table presents the liability for unpaid losses and LAE for the years ended December 31, 2005 through 2014 and does not distinguish between catastrophic and non-catastrophic events. The top line of the table shows the estimated liability for unpaid losses and LAE at the balance sheet date for each of the periods indicated. These figures represent the estimated amount of unpaid losses and LAE for claims arising in all prior years that were unpaid at the balance sheet date, including losses that had been IBNR. The portion of the table labeled "Cumulative paid as of" shows the cumulative payments for losses and LAE made in succeeding years for losses incurred prior to the balance sheet date. The lower portion of the table shows the re-estimated amount of the previously recorded liability based on experience as of the end of each succeeding year.

   
Years Ended December 31,
 
   
(Dollars in Thousands)
 
                                         
   
2014
   
2013
   
2012
   
2011
   
2010
   
2009
   
2008
   
2007
   
2006
   
2005
 
                                         
Unpaid losses and LAE, net
 
$
78,330
   
$
61,016
   
$
49,908
   
$
59,983
   
$
66,529
     
70,611
   
$
64,775
   
$
59,685
   
$
39,615
   
$
154,038
 
                                                                                 
Cumulative paid as of:
                                                                               
One year later
           
26,928
     
24,329
     
16,527
     
20,774
     
29,202
     
26,431
     
30,570
     
36,058
     
170,825
 
Two years later
                   
35,576
     
31,676
     
26,667
     
40,493
     
45,264
     
48,409
     
58,002
     
196,080
 
Three years later
                           
39,119
     
38,703
     
42,577
     
52,761
     
64,014
     
72,752
     
215,297
 
Four years later
                                   
44,305
     
50,096
     
53,689
     
68,865
     
86,110
     
228,805
 
Five years later
                                           
53,283
     
60,075
     
68,880
     
89,006
     
240,171
 
Six years later
                                                   
62,344
     
73,235
     
87,555
     
242,383
 
Seven years later
                                                           
74,627
     
90,910
     
244,405
 
Eight years later
                                                                   
91,885
     
246,286
 
Nine years later
                                                                           
247,124
 
                                                                                 
Re-estimated net liability as of:
                                                                               
End of year
   
78,330
     
61,016
     
49,908
     
59,983
     
66,529
     
70,611
     
64,775
     
59,685
     
39,615
     
154,038
 
One year later
           
62,120
     
46,245
     
58,389
     
62,756
     
73,122
     
75,646
     
69,383
     
71,907
     
193,068
 
Two years later
                   
50,241
     
58,711
     
51,266
     
70,709
     
80,606
     
82,890
     
80,383
     
223,005
 
Three years later
                           
58,027
     
51,936
     
59,276
     
78,132
     
88,159
     
97,174
     
231,761
 
Four years later
                                   
55,147
     
58,223
     
68,119
     
85,532
     
102,571
     
248,116
 
Five years later
                                           
59,401
     
69,226
     
77,294
     
99,710
     
252,365
 
Six years later
                                                   
61,051
     
78,541
     
93,878
     
249,744
 
Seven years later
                                                           
67,879
     
96,514
     
248,211
 
Eight years later
                                                                   
78,223
     
251,217
 
Nine years later
                                                                           
218,556
 
                                                                                 
Cumulative (deficiency) redundancy
           
(1,104
)
   
(333
)
   
1,956
     
11,382
     
11,210
     
3,724
     
(8,194
)
   
(38,608
)
   
(64,518
)
Cumulative (deficiency) redundancy as a % of reserves originally established
           
-1.8
%
   
-0.7
%
   
3.3
%
   
17.1
%
   
15.9
%
   
5.7
%
   
-13.7
%
   
-97.5
%
   
-41.9
%
 
The cumulative redundancy or deficiency represents the aggregate change in the estimates over all prior years. A deficiency indicates that the latest estimate of the liability for losses and LAE is higher than the liability that was originally estimated and a redundancy indicates that such estimate is lower. It should be emphasized that the table presents a run-off of balance sheet liability for the periods indicated rather than accident or policy loss development for those periods. Therefore, each amount in the table includes the cumulative effects of changes in liability for all prior periods. Conditions and trends that have affected liabilities in the past may not necessarily occur in the future.
 
- 17 -

Federated National Holding Company

As noted above, we have since experienced $1.1 million and $0.3 million cumulative deficiencies in connection with the re-estimation of all losses that occurred in 2013 and 2012, respectively.

The table below sets forth the differences between loss and LAE reserves as disclosed for GAAP basis compared with Statutory Accounting Principles (“SAP”) basis of presentation for the years ended 2014, 2013 and 2012.

    Years Ended December 31,  
   
2014
   
2013
   
2012
 
   
(Dollars in Thousands)
 
             
GAAP basis Loss and LAE reserves
 
$
78,330
   
$
61,016
   
$
49,908
 
Less unpaid Losses and LAE ceded
   
10,395
     
2,312
     
3,189
 
Balance Sheet Liability
   
67,935
     
58,704
     
46,719
 
Add Insurance Apportionment Plan
   
7
     
2
     
6
 
Intercompany Indemnification
   
279
     
(4,705
)
   
(2,039
)
FNIC SAP basis Loss and LAE reserves
 
$
68,221
   
$
54,001
   
$
44,686
 
 
The table below sets forth the differences between loss and LAE incurred as disclosed for GAAP basis compared with SAP basis presentation for the years ended 2014, 2013 and 2012.

    Years Ended December 31,  
   
2014
   
2013
   
2012
 
   
(Dollars in Thousands)
 
             
GAAP basis Loss and LAE incurred
 
$
81,036
   
$
56,410
   
$
30,209
 
Intercompany adjusting and other expenses
   
9,297
     
3,489
     
3,744
 
Insurance apportionment plan
   
40
     
13
     
(4
)
SAP basis Loss and LAE incurred
 
$
90,373
   
$
59,912
   
$
33,949
 
 
Underwriting results of insurance companies are frequently measured by their Combined Ratios. However, investment income, federal income taxes and other non-underwriting income or expense are not reflected in the Combined Ratio. The profitability of property and casualty insurance companies depends on income from underwriting, investment and service operations. Underwriting results are considered profitable when the Combined Ratio is under 100% and unprofitable when the Combined Ratio is over 100%.

The following table sets forth Loss Ratios, Expense Ratios and Combined Ratios for the periods indicated for the insurance business for 2014, 2013 and 2012, and are inclusive of Unallocated Loss Adjustment Expenses (“ULAE”).

   
Years Ended December 31,
 
   
2014
   
2013
   
2012
 
Loss Ratio
   
47.4
%
   
54.0
%
   
50.9
%
Expense Ratio
   
36.5
%
   
44.2
%
   
53.4
%
Combined Ratio
   
83.9
%
   
98.2
%
   
104.3
%
 
Our loss ratio is computed as losses and LAE divided by net premiums earned. A lower loss ratio generally results in higher operating income. Our loss ratio for 2014 was 47.4% compared with 54.0% for the same period in 2013. The decrease to our loss ratio is due to the $24.6 million increase in losses and LAE measured against the $66.5 million increase in net premium earned during 2014 as compared with the same period in 2013.

Our expense ratio is computed as the sum of operating and underwriting expenses plus salaries and wages plus amortization of Deferred Policy Acquisition Costs (“DPAC”) divided by net premiums earned. A lower expense ratio generally results in higher operating income. Our expense ratio for 2014 was 36.5% compared with 44.2% for the same period in 2013. The decrease to our expense ratio is due to the $16.2 million increase in the sum of operating and underwriting expenses plus salaries and wages plus amortization of DPAC measured against the $66.5 million increase in net premium earned during 2014 as compared with the same period in 2013.
 
- 18 -

Federated National Holding Company
 
COMPETITION

We operate in highly competitive markets and face competition from national, regional and residual market insurance companies in the homeowners’, commercial general liability, and automobile markets. Our competitors include companies that market their products through agents, as well as companies that sell insurance directly to their customers. Large national writers may have certain competitive advantages over agency writers, including increased name recognition, increased loyalty of their customer base and reduced policy acquisition costs. We compete based on underwriting criteria, our distribution network and superior service to our agents and insureds. Although our pricing is inevitably influenced to some degree by that of our competitors, we believe that it is generally not in our best interest to compete solely on price.

In Florida, more than 100 companies compete with us in the homeowners’ insurance market.  Several of our larger competitors are Citizens, Universal Property and Casualty Insurance Company and St. Johns Insurance Company.  In Florida, more than one dozen companies compete with us in the commercial general liability insurance market.

Significant competition also emerged because of fundamental changes made to the property and casualty insurance business in Florida in recent years which resulted in a multi-pronged approach to address the cost of residential property insurance in Florida. First, the law increased the capacity of reinsurance that stabilized the reinsurance market to the benefit of the insurance companies writing properties lines in Florida. Secondly, the law provided for rate relief to all policyholders. The law also authorized the state-owned insurance company, Citizens, which is free of many of the restraints on private carriers such as surplus, ratios, income taxes and reinsurance expense, to reduce its premium rates and begin competing against private insurers in the residential property insurance market and expands the authority of Citizens to write commercial insurance.

As a result of legislation in 2013, Citizens has reduced its insurance policy count and established the Property Insurance Clearinghouse (“Clearinghouse”). The Clearinghouse launched in January 2014, for new business ineligible for Citizens if a participating insurance company is willing to afford similar coverage at a price that is no more than 15% above the price of a policy with Citizens. Similarly, existing Citizens policies are not be eligible for renewal with Citizens if a participating insurance company is willing to afford similar coverage at no additional cost over the price for a Citizens policy. This allows potentially new and renewal policies of Citizens to be comparatively shopped by participating private market insurers before becoming, or remaining, policies of Citizens. Effective March 30, 2014, FNIC joined as a participating insurance company in the Clearinghouse.

REGULATION

General

We are subject to the laws and regulations in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, South Carolina and Texas and regulations of any other states in which we seek to conduct business in the future. The regulations cover all aspects of our business and are generally designed to protect the interests of insurance policyholders, as opposed to the interests of shareholders. Such regulations relate to authorized lines of business, capital and surplus requirements, allowable rates and forms, investment parameters, underwriting limitations, transactions with affiliates, dividend limitations, changes in control, market conduct, maximum amount allowable for premium financing service charges and a variety of other financial and non-financial components of our business. Our failure to comply with certain provisions of applicable insurance laws and regulations could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition. In addition, any changes in such laws and regulations, including the adoption of consumer initiatives regarding rates charged for coverage, could materially and adversely affect our operations or our ability to expand.

Most states’ laws restrict an insurer’s underwriting discretion, such as the ability to terminate policies, terminate agents or reject insurance coverage applications, and many state regulators have the power to reduce, or to disallow, increases in premium rates. In addition, state laws generally require that rate schedules and other information be filed with the state's insurance regulatory authority, either directly or through a rating organization with which the insurer is affiliated. The regulatory authority may disapprove a rate filing if it finds that the rates are inadequate, excessive or unfairly discriminatory. Rates, which are not necessarily uniform for all insurers, vary by class of business, hazard covered, and size of risk. Certain states, including Florida, as discussed above, have adopted laws or are considering proposed legislation which, among other things, limit the ability of insurance companies to effect rate increases or to cancel, reduce or non-renew insurance coverage with respect to existing policies, particularly personal automobile insurance.

Most states require licensure or regulatory approval prior to the marketing of new insurance products. Typically, licensure review is comprehensive and includes a review of a company’s business plan, solvency, reinsurance, character of its officers and directors, rates, forms and other financial and non-financial aspects of a company. The regulatory authorities may prohibit entry into a new market by not granting a license or by withholding approval.
- 19 -

Federated National Holding Company

All insurance companies must file quarterly and annual statements with certain regulatory agencies and are subject to regular and special examinations by those agencies. We may be the subject of additional special examinations or analysis. These examinations or analysis may result in one or more corrective orders being issued by the Florida OIR. The most recent balance sheet audit of FNIC by the Florida OIR occurred as of December 31, 2010. There were no material findings by the independent auditors in connection with this examination. FNIC also experienced a regularly scheduled statutory examination by the Florida OIR which occurred during 2010 for the five years ended December 31, 2010. There were no material findings in connection with this examination.

 In some instances, various states routinely require deposits of assets for the protection of policyholders either in those states or for all policyholders. As an example, the Florida OIR requires FNIC to have securities with a fair market value of $2.0 million held in escrow. As of December 31, 2014, FNIC held investment securities with a fair value of approximately $2.3 million, as a deposit with the State of Florida. Additionally, as of December 31, 2014 FNIC had cash deposits totaling $415,000 with the State of Alabama, $238,000 with the State of Louisiana and $25,000 with the State of Georgia.

As of December 31, 2013, FNIC held investment securities with a fair value of approximately $2.0 million, as a deposit with the State of Florida. Additionally, as of December 31, 2013 FNIC had cash deposits totaling $370,000 with the State of Alabama, $118,900 with the State of Louisiana and $25,000 with the State of Georgia.

Consent Order

As of September 30, 2014, we had satisfied all applicable conditions of the Consent Order we entered into in January 2011 (the “Consent Order”) with the Florida OIR.  We entered into the Consent Order in connection with the merger of our one of our wholly owned insurance subsidiaries, American Vehicle Insurance Company (“American Vehicle”), into FNIC, with FNIC continuing the operations of both entities.  As of the date of this Report, the only operational restriction that remains in effect is a requirement to obtain OIR approval prior to writing commercial multi-peril business or any new commercial property business, including condo associations, under any other line of business for which FNIC is authorized.  FNIC currently has no commercial multi-peril policy premium in-force and the current commercial habitation book of business is fully earned. The Consent Order required us to, among other things, limit the number of policies that we write in the Tri-County area and imposed certain other operational requirements on us, all of which we have complied with.

Restrictions in Payments of Dividends by Domestic Insurance Companies

Under Florida law, a domestic insurer may not pay any dividend or distribute cash or other property to its shareholders except out of that part of its available and accumulated capital surplus funds which is derived from realized net operating profits on its business and net realized capital gains. A Florida domestic insurer may not make dividend payments or distributions to shareholders without prior approval of the Florida OIR if the dividend or distribution would exceed the larger of (i) the lesser of (a) 10.0% of its capital surplus or (b) net income, not including realized capital gains, plus a two-year carryforward, (ii) 10.0% of capital surplus with dividends payable constrained to unassigned funds minus 25.0% of unrealized capital gains or (iii) the lesser of (a) 10.0% of capital surplus or (b) net investment income plus a three-year carryforward with dividends payable constrained to unassigned funds minus 25.0% of unrealized capital gains.

Alternatively, a Florida domestic insurer may pay a dividend or distribution without the prior written approval of the Florida OIR (i) if the dividend is equal to or less than the greater of (a) 10.0% of the insurer’s capital surplus as regards policyholders derived from realized net operating profits on its business and net realized capital gains or (b) the insurer’s entire net operating profits and realized net capital gains derived during the immediately preceding calendar year, (ii) the insurer will have policy holder capital surplus equal to or exceeding 115.0% of the minimum required statutory capital surplus after the dividend or distribution, (iii) the insurer files a notice of the dividend or distribution with the Florida OIR at least ten business days prior to the dividend payment or distribution and (iv) the notice includes a certification by an officer of the insurer attesting that, after the payment of the dividend or distribution, the insurer will have at least 115.0% of required statutory capital surplus as to policyholders. Except as provided above, a Florida domiciled insurer may only pay a dividend or make a distribution (i) subject to prior approval by the Florida OIR or (ii) 30 days after the Florida OIR has received notice of such dividend or distribution and has not disapproved it within such time.

No dividends were paid by FNIC or American Vehicle in 2014, 2013 and 2012, and none are anticipated in 2015. Although we believe that amounts required to meet our financial and operating obligations will be available from sources other than dividends from our insurance subsidiaries, there can be no assurance in this regard. Further, there can be no assurance that, if requested, the Florida OIR will allow any dividends to be paid by FNIC to us, the parent company, in the future. The maximum dividends permitted by state law are not necessarily indicative of an insurer’s actual ability to pay dividends or other distributions to a parent company, which also may be constrained by business and regulatory considerations, such as the impact of dividends on capital surplus, which could affect an insurer’s competitive position, the amount of premiums that can be written and the ability to pay future dividends. Further, state insurance laws and regulations require that the statutory capital surplus of an insurance company following any dividend or distribution by it be reasonable in relation to its outstanding liabilities and adequate for its financial needs.
 
- 20 -

Federated National Holding Company

While the non-insurance company subsidiaries (FNU, FNA and any other affiliate) are not subject directly to the dividend and other distribution limitations, insurance holding company regulations govern the amount that any affiliate within the holding company system may charge any of the insurance companies for service (e.g., management fees and commissions).

National Association of Insurance Commissioners (“NAIC”) Risk-Based Capital Requirements

In order to enhance the regulation of insurer solvency, NAIC established risk-based capital requirements for insurance companies that are designed to assess capital adequacy and to raise the level of protection that statutory surplus provides for policy holders. These requirements measure three major areas of risk facing property and casualty insurers: (i) underwriting risks, which encompass the risk of adverse loss developments and inadequate pricing; (ii) declines in asset values arising from credit risk; and (iii) other business risks from investments. Insurers having less statutory surplus than required will be subject to varying degrees of regulatory action, depending on the level of capital inadequacy. The Florida OIR, which follows these requirements, could require FNIC to cease operations in the event they fail to maintain the required statutory capital.

Based upon the 2014 and 2013 statutory financial statements for FNIC, statutory surplus exceeded the regulatory action levels established by the NAIC’s risk-based capital requirements.

Based on risk-based capital requirements, the extent of regulatory intervention and action increases as the ratio of an insurer’s statutory surplus to its Authorized Control Level (“ACL”), as calculated under the NAIC’s requirements, decreases. The first action level, the Company Action Level, requires an insurer to submit a plan of corrective actions to the insurance regulators if statutory surplus falls below 200.0% of the ACL amount. The second action level, the Regulatory Action Level, requires an insurer to submit a plan containing corrective actions and permits the insurance regulators to perform an examination or other analysis and issue a corrective order if statutory surplus falls below 150.0% of the ACL amount. The third action level, ACL, allows the regulators to rehabilitate or liquidate an insurer in addition to the aforementioned actions if statutory surplus falls below the ACL amount. The fourth action level is the Mandatory Control Level, which requires the regulators to rehabilitate or liquidate the insurer if statutory surplus falls below 70.0% of the ACL amount. FNIC’s ratio of statutory surplus to its ACL was 534.0%, 312.1% and 474.4% at December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

Insurance Regulatory Information Systems (“IRIS”) Ratios

The NAIC has also developed IRIS ratios to assist state insurance departments in identifying companies which may be developing performance or solvency problems, as signaled by significant changes in the companies’ operations. Such changes may not necessarily result from any problems with an insurance company, but may merely indicate changes in certain ratios outside the ranges defined as normal by the NAIC. When an insurance company has four or more ratios falling outside “usual ranges”, state regulators may investigate to determine the reasons for the variance and whether corrective action is warranted.

As of December 31, 2014, FNIC was outside NAIC’s usual range for four of thirteen IRIS ratios. These exceptions related to change in policyholder surplus growth, investment yield and estimated current reserve deficiency to policyholders’ surplus. The policyholder surplus growth exceeded the normal range due to the Company’s surplus infusion into FNIC totaling approximately $18.5 million. The increase in earned premiums during 2014 lead to the exceptional value for the Estimated Current Reserve to Deficiency to Surplus result.

As of December 31, 2013, FNIC was outside NAIC’s usual range for three of thirteen IRIS ratios. These exceptions related to change in net writings, investment yield and estimated current reserve deficiency to policyholders’ surplus.

As of December 31, 2012, FNIC was outside NAIC’s usual range for three of thirteen IRIS ratios. These exceptions related to investment yield, net change in adjusted policyholders’ surplus and estimated current reserve deficiency to policyholders’ surplus.

There was no action taken by the Florida OIR in connection with the December 31, 2013 or 2012 IRIS ratio results. We do not currently believe that the Florida OIR will take any significant action with respect to FNIC regarding the 2014 IRIS ratios, although there can be no assurance that will be the case.
 
- 21 -

Federated National Holding Company

Insurance Holding Company Regulation

We, the parent company, are subject to laws governing insurance holding companies in Florida where FNHC is domiciled. These laws, among other things, (i) require us to file periodic information with the Florida OIR, including information concerning our capital structure, ownership, financial condition and general business operations, (ii) regulate certain transactions between us and our affiliates, including the amount of dividends and other distributions, the terms of surplus notes and amounts that our affiliates can charge the holding company for services such as management fees or commissions, (iii) restrict the ability of any one person to acquire certain levels of our voting securities without prior regulatory approval. Any purchaser of 5% or more of the outstanding shares of our Common Stock will be presumed to have acquired control of FNHC unless the Florida OIR, upon application, determines otherwise.

Underwriting and Marketing Restrictions

During the past several years, various regulatory and legislative bodies have adopted or proposed new laws or regulations to address the cyclical nature of the insurance industry, catastrophic events and insurance capacity and pricing. These regulations include (i) the creation of "market assistance plans" under which insurers are induced to provide certain coverages, (ii) restrictions on the ability of insurers to rescind or otherwise cancel certain policies in mid-term, (iii) advance notice requirements or limitations imposed for certain policy non-renewals and (iv) limitations upon or decreases in rates permitted to be charged.

Industry Ratings Services

Third-party rating agencies assess and rate the ability of insurers to pay their claims. These financial strength ratings are used by the insurance industry to assess the financial strength and quality of insurers. These ratings are based on criteria established by the rating agencies and reflect evaluations of each insurer's profitability, debt and cash levels, customer base, adequacy and soundness of reinsurance, quality and estimated market value of assets, adequacy of reserves and management. Ratings are based upon factors of concern to agents, reinsurers and policyholders and are not directed toward the protection of investors, such as purchasers of our common stock.

As of December 31, 2014, FNIC is rated by Demotech as "A" ("Exceptional"), which is the third of seven ratings, and defined as “Regardless of the severity of a general economic downturn or deterioration in the insurance cycle, insurers earning a Financial Stability Rating (“FSR”) of “A” possess “Exceptional” financial stability related to maintaining surplus as regards to policyholders”. Demotech’s ratings are based upon factors of concern to agents, reinsurers and policyholders and are not primarily directed toward the protection of investors. Our Demotech rating could be jeopardized by factors including adverse development and various surplus related ratio exceptions. On November 22, 2014, Demotech reaffirmed FNIC’s FSR of “A” (“Exceptional”).

The withdrawal of our ratings could limit or prevent us from writing or renewing desirable insurance policies, from competing with insurers who have higher ratings, from obtaining adequate reinsurance, or from borrowing on a line of credit. The withdrawal of our ratings could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s results of operations and financial position because the Company’s insurance products might no longer be acceptable to the secondary marketplace and mortgage lenders. Furthermore, a withdrawal of our ratings could prevent independent agents from selling and servicing our insurance products.

EMPLOYEES

As of December 31, 2014, we had 219 employees, including two executive officers. We are not a party to any collective bargaining agreement and we have not experienced work stoppages or strikes as a result of labor disputes. We consider relations with our employees to be satisfactory.
 
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Federated National Holding Company

ITEM 1A
RISK FACTORS

We are subject to certain risks in our business operations which are described below. Careful consideration of these risks should be made before making an investment decision. The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones facing FNHC. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known or currently deemed immaterial may also impair our business operations.

Risks Related to Our Business

Our financial condition could be adversely affected by the occurrence of natural and man-made disasters.

We write insurance policies that cover homeowners, business owners and automobile owners for losses that result from, among other things, catastrophes and sinkholes. Catastrophic losses can be caused by natural events such as hurricanes, tropical storms, tornadoes, wind, hail, fires, explosions and other events, and their incidence and severity are inherently unpredictable. They can also be caused by terrorist attacks, war, riots, political instability and other man-made events. The extent of losses from a catastrophe is a function of two factors: the total amount of the insurance company's exposure in the area affected by the event and the severity of the event. Although our homeowners' policyholders are disbursed throughout Florida, substantially all of them are located in Florida, which is especially subject to adverse weather conditions such as hurricanes and tropical storms, and a substantial portion are located in southeastern Florida.

The occurrence of claims from catastrophic events could result in substantial volatility in our results of operations or financial condition for any fiscal quarter or year. Increases in the values and concentrations of insured property may also increase the severity of these occurrences in the future. Although we attempt to manage our exposure to such events through the use of underwriting controls and the purchase of third-party reinsurance, catastrophic events are inherently unpredictable and the actual nature of such events when they occur could be more frequent or severe than contemplated in our pricing and risk management expectations. As a result, the occurrence of one or more catastrophic events could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations or financial condition.

Although Florida has not experienced a hurricane during the last nine hurricane seasons, some weather analysts believe that we have entered a period of greater hurricane activity. We are exploring alternatives to reduce our exposure to these types of storms, which may increase operating expenses and may not be successful in protecting long-term profitability. If our loss experience is more adverse than is contemplated by our loss reserves, the related increase in our loss reserves may have a material adverse effect on our results of operations in the period in which the increase occurs.

Although we follow the industry practice of reinsuring a portion of our risks, our costs of obtaining reinsurance fluctuates and we may not be able to successfully alleviate risk through reinsurance arrangements.

We have a reinsurance structure that is a combination of private reinsurance and the FHCF. Our reinsurance structure is composed of several reinsurance companies with varying levels of participation providing coverage for loss and LAE at pre-established minimum and maximum amounts. Losses incurred in connection with a catastrophic event below the minimum and above the maximum are the responsibility of FNIC.

The availability and costs associated with the acquisition of reinsurance will vary year to year. We are not able to control these fluctuations which may be significant and may limit our ability to purchase adequate coverage. The recovery of increased reinsurance costs through rate action is not immediate and cannot be presumed, as it is subject to approval of the Florida OIR.

We face a risk of non-collectability of reinsurance, which could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

As is common practice within the insurance industry, we transfer a portion of the risks insured under our policies to other companies through the purchase of reinsurance. This reinsurance is maintained to protect our insurance subsidiary against the severity of losses on individual claims, unusually serious occurrences in which a number of claims produce an aggregate extraordinary loss and other catastrophic events. Although reinsurance does not discharge our insurance subsidiary from its primary obligation to pay for losses insured under the policies it issues, reinsurance does make the assuming reinsurer liable to the insurance subsidiary for the reinsured portion of the risk. A credit exposure exists with respect to ceded losses to the extent that any reinsurer is unable or unwilling to meet the obligations assumed under the reinsurance contracts. The collectability of reinsurance is subject to the solvency of the reinsurers, interpretation of contract language and other factors. A reinsurer's insolvency or inability to make payments under the terms of a reinsurance contract could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
 
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Federated National Holding Company
 
Our reinsurance structure has significant risks, including the fact that the FHCF may not be able to raise sufficient money to pay their claims or impair their ability to pay their claims in a timely manner. This could result in significant financial, legal and operational challenges to our company. Therefore, in the event of a catastrophic loss, we may become dependent upon the FHCF's ability to pay, which may, in turn, be dependent upon the MCP's ability to issue bonds in amounts that would be required to meet its reinsurance obligations in the event of such a catastrophic loss.

Our January 2011 Consent Order with the Florida OIR, as amended in February 2013, limits our business in certain respects and may prevent us from growing our business.

In January 2011, we entered into a Consent Order with the Florida OIR, in connection with our request for approval of the merger of FNIC, into American Vehicle, one of our other subsidiaries at the time. The Consent Order was amended in February 2013 to lessen or eliminate certain of the original requirements, due to FNIC's statutory underwriting profit during 2012. Among other things, the Consent Order as amended requires us to limit the concentration of our homeowners' policies in Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties. This reduction in concentration could materially adversely affect us by limiting our ability to write policies in the most populous region of the State of Florida, which could materially adversely affect our results of operations if we are not able to replace those policies with policies elsewhere in Florida or the other states in which we do business.

 If we are unable to continue our growth because our capital must be used to pay greater than anticipated claims, our financial results may suffer.

Our future growth will depend on our ability to expand the types of insurance products we offer and the geographic markets in which we do business, both balanced by the business risks we choose to assume and cede. We believe that our Company is sufficiently capitalized to operate our business as it now exists and as we currently plan to expand it. Our existing sources of funds include possible sales of our investment securities and our earnings from operations and investments. Unexpected catastrophic events in our market areas, such as the hurricanes experienced in Florida, have resulted and may result in greater claims losses than anticipated, which could require us to limit or halt our growth while we redeploy our capital to pay these unanticipated claims.

We may require additional capital in the future which may not be available or only available on unfavorable terms.

Our future capital requirements depend on many factors, including our ability to write new business successfully and to establish premium rates and reserves at levels sufficient to cover losses. Based on our current operating plan, we believe current capital, together with our anticipated retained earnings, will support our operations without the need to raise additional capital. To the extent that our capital may be insufficient to meet future operating requirements and/or cover losses, we may need to raise additional funds through financings or curtail our growth. Many factors will affect the amount and timing of our capital needs, including our growth and profitability, our claims experience, and the availability of reinsurance, as well as possible acquisition opportunities, market disruptions and other unforeseeable developments.

If we were required to raise additional capital, equity or debt financing may not be available at all or may be available only on terms that are not favorable to us. In the case of equity financings, dilution to our stockholders’ ownership could result, and in any case such securities may have rights, preferences and privileges that are senior to those of existing shareholders. If we raise additional funds by incurring debt financing, the terms of the debt may involve significant cash payment obligations as well as covenants and specific financial ratios that may restrict our ability to operate our business or pay dividends. If we cannot obtain adequate capital on favorable terms or at all, our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

Our business is heavily regulated, and changes in regulation may reduce our profitability and limit our growth.

We are subject to extensive regulation in the states in which we conduct business. This regulation is generally designed to protect the interests of policyholders, as opposed to shareholders and other investors, and relates to authorization for lines of business, capital and surplus requirements, investment limitations, underwriting limitations, transactions with affiliates, dividend limitations, changes in control, premium rates and a variety of other financial and non-financial components of an insurance company's business. These regulatory requirements may adversely affect or inhibit our ability to achieve some or all of our business objectives. State regulatory authorities also conduct periodic examinations into insurers' business practices. These reviews may reveal deficiencies in our insurance operations or differences between our interpretations of regulatory requirements and those of the regulators.
 
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Federated National Holding Company

The National Association of Insurance Commissioners, or NAIC, and state insurance regulators are constantly reexamining existing laws and regulations, generally focusing on modifications to holding company regulations, interpretations of existing laws and the development of new laws.

From time to time, some states in which we conduct business have considered or enacted laws that may alter or increase state authority to regulate insurance companies and insurance holding companies. In other situations, states in which we conduct business have considered or enacted laws that impact the competitive environment and marketplace for property and casualty insurance. In addition, in recent years the state insurance regulatory framework has come under increased federal scrutiny. Changes in federal legislation and administrative policies in several areas, including changes in financial services regulation and federal taxation, can significantly impact the insurance industry and us.

We cannot predict with certainty the effect any enacted, proposed or future state or federal legislation or NAIC initiatives may have on the conduct of our business. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that the regulatory requirements applicable to our business will not become more stringent in the future or result in materially higher costs than current requirements. Changes in the regulation of our business may reduce our profitability, limit our growth or otherwise adversely affect our operations.

We may experience financial exposure from climate change.

A body of scientific evidence seems to indicate that climate change may be occurring. Climate change, to the extent that it may affect weather patterns, may cause an increase in the frequency and/or the severity of catastrophic events or severe weather conditions. Our financial exposure from climate change is most notably associated with losses in connection with the occurrence of hurricanes striking Florida. We mitigate the risk of financial exposure from climate change by restrictive underwriting criteria, sensitivity to geographic concentrations, and reinsurance.

Restrictive underwriting criteria can include, but are not limited to, higher premiums and deductibles and more specifically excluded policy risks such as fences and screened-in enclosures. New technological advances in computer generated geographical mapping afford us an enhanced perspective as to geographic concentrations of policyholders and proximity to flood prone areas. Our amount of maximum reinsurance coverage is determined by subjecting our homeowner exposures to statistical forecasting models that are designed to quantify a catastrophic event in terms of the frequency of a storm occurring once in every "n" years. Our reinsurance coverage contemplates the effects of a catastrophic event that occurs only once every 100 years. Our amount of losses retained (our deductible) in connection with a catastrophic event is determined by market capacity, pricing conditions and surplus preservation. There can be no assurance that our reinsurance coverage and other measures taken will be sufficient to mitigate losses resulting from one or more catastrophic events.

Our loss reserves are estimates and may be inadequate to cover our actual liability for losses, causing our results of operations to be adversely affected.

We maintain reserves to cover our estimated ultimate liabilities for loss and LAE. These reserves are estimates based on historical data and statistical projections of what we believe the settlement and administration of claims will cost based on facts and circumstances then known to us. Actual loss and LAE reserves, however, may vary significantly from our estimates.

Factors that affect unpaid losses and LAE include the estimates made on a claim-by-claim basis known as "case reserves" coupled with bulk estimates known as IBNR Periodic estimates by management of the ultimate costs required to settle all claim files are based on our analysis of historical data and estimations of the impact of numerous factors such as (i) per claim information; (ii) company and industry historical loss experience; (iii) legislative enactments, judicial decisions, legal developments in the awarding of damages, and changes in political attitudes; and (iv) trends in general economic conditions, including the effects of inflation. Management revises its estimates based on the results of its analysis. This process assumes that past experience, adjusted for the effects of current developments and anticipated trends, is an appropriate basis for estimating the ultimate settlement of all claims. There is no precise method for subsequently evaluating the impact of any specific factor on the adequacy of the reserves, because the eventual redundancy or deficiency is affected by multiple factors.

Because of the uncertainties that surround estimated loss reserves, we cannot be certain that our reserves will be adequate to cover our actual losses. If our reserves for unpaid losses and LAE are less than actual losses and LAE, we will be required to increase our reserves with a corresponding reduction in our net income in the period in which the deficiency is identified. Future loss experience, substantially in excess of our reserves for unpaid losses and LAE, could substantially harm our results of operations and financial condition.
 
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Federated National Holding Company

Our revenues and operating performance will fluctuate due to statutorily approved assessments that support property and casualty insurance pools and associations.

We operate in a regulatory environment where certain entities and organizations have the authority to require us to participate in assessments. Currently these entities and organizations include, but are not limited to, the Florida Joint Underwriters Association, the Florida Insurance Guaranty Association, Citizens and the FHCF.

The insurance companies currently pass the assessments on to holders or insurance policies, in the form of a policy surcharge, and reflect the collection of these assessments as fully earned credits to operations in the period collected. The collection of these fees may adversely affect our overall marketing strategy due to the competitive landscape in Florida.

In addition, the impact of future assessments on our balance sheet, results of operations or cash flow are undeterminable at this time.

Our investment portfolio may suffer reduced returns or losses, which would significantly reduce our earnings.

Like other insurance companies, we depend on income from our investment portfolio for a substantial portion of our earnings. During the time that normally elapses between the receipt of insurance premiums and any payment of insurance claims, we invest the premiums received, together with our other available capital, primarily in debt securities and to a lesser extent in equity securities, in order to generate investment income.

Our investment portfolio contains interest rate sensitive instruments, such as bonds, which may be adversely affected by changes in interest rates. A significant increase in interest rates or decrease in credit worthiness could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations. Generally, bond prices decrease as interest rates rise. Changes in interest rates could also have an adverse effect on our investment income and results of operations. For example, if interest rates decline, investment of new premiums received and funds reinvested will earn less than expected.

Our determination of the amount of other-than-temporary impairment to record varies by investment type and is based upon our periodic evaluation and assessment of known and inherent risks associated with the respective investment type. We revise our evaluations and assessments as conditions change and new information becomes available, and we reflect changes in other-than- temporary impairments in our consolidated statements of income. We base our assessment of whether other-than-temporary impairments have occurred on our case-by-case evaluation of the underlying reasons for the decline in fair value. We can neither provide assurance that we have accurately assessed whether the impairment of one or more of our investments is temporary or other-than-temporary, nor that we have accurately recorded amounts for other-than-temporary impairments in our financial statements. Furthermore, historical trends may not be indicative of future impairments and additional impairments may need to be recorded in the future.

In addition, volatile and illiquid markets increase the likelihood that investment securities may not behave in historically predictable manners, resulting in fair value estimates that may be overstated compared with actual amounts that could be realized upon disposition or maturity of the security. The effects of market volatility and declining economic conditions may have unforeseen consequences on the credit quality, liquidity and financial stability of the issuers of securities we hold, or reinsurers with which we do business. Such deteriorations in financial condition can occur rapidly, leaving us unable to react to such a scenario in a prudent manner consistent with our historical practices in dealing with more orderly markets. This in turn could adversely and negatively affect our results of operations, liquidity or financial condition.

We may experience a loss due to the concentration of credit risk.

Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to significant concentration of credit risk consist of cash and cash equivalents held in a mutual fund money market account. The Company had approximately $17.3 million and $12.2 million invested in the Wilmington Prime Money Market Fund – Class Select (Ticker: VSMXX, CUSIP: 97181C308), for which the NAIC classification is Class 1, as of December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. Although this fund is on the Class 1 list, the highest rating available, there can be no assurance that it will remain financially sound. If the MTB Fund were to experience financial difficulty such that it could not repay the money we have invested in the fund, our financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.
 
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Federated National Holding Company

The failure of any of the loss limitation methods we employ could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or our results of operations.

Various provisions of our policies, such as limitations or exclusions from coverage which have been negotiated to limit our risks, may not be enforceable in the manner we intend. At the present time we employ a variety of exclusions to our policies that limit exposure to known risks, including, but not limited to, exclusions relating to certain named liabilities, types of vehicles and specific artisan activities.

In addition, the policies we issue contain conditions requiring the prompt reporting of claims to us and our right to decline coverage in the event of a violation of that condition. While we believe our insurance product exclusions and limitations reduce the loss exposure to us and help eliminate known exposures to certain risks, it is possible that a court or regulatory authority could nullify or void an exclusion or that legislation could be enacted modifying or barring the use of such endorsements and limitations in a way that would adversely affect our loss experience, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations.

The effects of emerging claim and coverage issues on our business are uncertain.

As industry practices and legal, judicial, social and other conditions change, unexpected and unintended issues related to claims and coverage may emerge. These issues may adversely affect our business by either extending coverage beyond our underwriting intent or by increasing the number or size of claims. In some instances, these changes may not become apparent until sometime after we have issued insurance contracts that are affected by the changes. As a result, the full extent of liability under our insurance contracts may not be known for many years after a contract is issued.

An example of such emerging change was the influence public adjusters have had on property claim patterns. Public adjusters represented the vast majority of new and reopened claims filed during 2011 and 2010 where the cause of loss was asserted as hurricane related. Although the legitimacy of the claim may not prevail we are still required to research, review and sometimes mediate these claims. Several legislative actions in of the State of Florida, such as limiting the time a claim can be filed subsequent to the cause of loss, have either passed or remain in legislative sub-committees. Each of these actions is designed to enhance the legitimacy of the public adjusters’ influence on the claim process.

Our failure to pay claims accurately could adversely affect our business, financial results and capital requirements.

We must accurately evaluate and pay claims that are made under our policies. Many factors affect our ability to pay claims accurately, including the training and experience of our claims representatives, the culture of our claims organization and the effectiveness of our management, our ability to develop or select and implement appropriate procedures and systems to support our claims functions and other factors. Our failure to pay claims accurately could lead to material litigation, undermine our reputation in the marketplace, impair our image and negatively affect our financial results.

In addition, if we do not train new claims adjusting employees effectively or if we lose a significant number of experienced claims adjusting employees, our claims department's ability to handle an increasing workload as we grow could be adversely affected. In addition to potentially requiring that growth be slowed in the affected markets, we could suffer decreased quality of claims work, which in turn could lower our operating margins.

Our insurance company is subject to minimum capital and surplus requirements, and our failure to meet these requirements could subject us to regulatory action.

Our insurance company is subject to risk-based capital standards and other minimum capital and surplus requirements imposed under applicable state laws, including the laws of the State of Florida. The risk-based capital standards, based upon the Risk Based Capital Model Act adopted by the NAIC, require our insurance company to report their results of risk-based capital calculations to state departments of insurance and the NAIC. These risk-based capital standards provide for different levels of regulatory attention depending upon the ratio of an insurance company's total adjusted capital, as calculated in accordance with NAIC guidelines, to its authorized control level risk-based capital.

If we fail to meet the applicable risk-based capital or minimum statutory capital requirements imposed by the laws of Florida or other states where we do business, we could be subject to further examination or corrective action imposed by state regulators, including limitations on out writing of additional business, state supervision or liquidation, and may be required to raise additional capital. Similarly, an increase in existing risk-based capital requirements or minimum statutory capital requirements may require us to increase our statutory capital levels. As of December 31, 2014, FNIC was in compliance with the NAIC risk-based capital requirements (see “Business-Regulation” for further discussion).
 
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Federated National Holding Company

Our revenues and operating performance may fluctuate with business cycles in the property and casualty insurance industry.

Historically, the financial performance of the property and casualty insurance industry has tended to fluctuate in cyclical patterns characterized by periods of significant competition in pricing and underwriting terms and conditions, which is known as a "soft" insurance market, followed by periods of lessened competition and increasing premium rates, which is known as a "hard" insurance market. Although an individual insurance company's financial performance is dependent on its own specific business characteristics, the profitability of most property and casualty insurance companies tends to follow this cyclical market pattern, with profitability generally increasing in hard markets and decreasing in soft markets. At present, we are experiencing a softening market in the property and casualty market in Florida because of increased competition. We cannot predict, however, how long these market conditions will persist. Although we do not compete entirely on price or targeted market share, negative market conditions may impair our ability to write insurance at rates that we consider appropriate relative to the risk assumed. If we cannot write insurance at appropriate rates, our revenues and operating performance may be adversely affected.

We may not obtain the necessary regulatory approvals to expand the types of insurance products we offer or the states in which we operate.

The insurance industry is highly regulated. Prior to selling a new insurance product in a state, we must obtain approval from the applicable state insurance regulators. The insurance regulators in states to which we might apply may request additional information, add conditions to the license that we find unacceptable, or deny our application. This would delay or prevent us from operating in that state. If we want to operate in any additional states, we must file similar applications for licenses, which we may not be successful in obtaining.

Adverse ratings by insurance rating agencies may adversely impact our ability to write new policies, renew desirable policies or obtain adequate insurance, which could limit or halt our growth and harm our business.

Third-party rating agencies assess and rate the ability of insurers to pay their claims. These financial strength ratings are used by the insurance industry to assess the financial strength and quality of insurers. These ratings are based on criteria established by the rating agencies and reflect evaluations of each insurer's profitability, debt and cash levels, customer base, adequacy and soundness of reinsurance, quality and estimated market value of assets, adequacy of reserves, and management. Ratings are based upon factors of concern to agents, reinsurers and policyholders and are not directed toward the protection of investors, such as purchasers of our common stock.

The withdrawal of our ratings could limit or prevent us from writing or renewing desirable insurance policies, from competing with insurers who have higher ratings, from obtaining adequate reinsurance, or from borrowing on a line of credit.
The withdrawal or downgrade of our ratings could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial position because our insurance products might no longer be acceptable to the secondary marketplace and mortgage lenders. Furthermore, a withdrawal or downgrade of our ratings could prevent independent agents from selling and servicing our insurance products or could increase the commissions we must pay to these agents.

We rely on independent and general agents to write our insurance policies, and if we are not able to attract and retain independent and general agents, our revenues would be negatively affected.

We currently market and distribute our products and services through contractual relationships with a network of   approximately 3,600 independent agents, of which approximately 2,300 actively sell and service our products, and a selected number of general agents. Our independent agents are our primary source for our property and liability insurance policies. Many of our competitors also rely on independent agents. As a result, we must compete with other insurers for independent agents' business. Our competitors may offer a greater variety of insurance products, lower premiums for insurance coverage, or higher commissions to their agents. If our products, pricing and commissions do not remain competitive, we may find it more difficult to attract business from independent agents to sell our products. A material reduction in the amount of our products that independent agents sell or a material reduction in the number of independent agents with whom we maintain a relationship could negatively affect our results of operations and financial condition.

In February 2013, we entered into an Insurance Agency Master Agreement with Ivantage Select Agency, Inc., or ISA, an affiliate of Allstate Insurance Company, or Allstate, pursuant to which we are authorized by ISA to appoint Allstate agents to offer our homeowners' and commercial general liability insurance products to consumers in Florida. Since that time, our homeowners' premiums and the percentage of homeowners' premiums attributable to Allstate agents has increased rapidly. During 2014, 33.4% of the homeowners' premiums we underwrote were from Allstate's network of Florida agents, and this concentration may continue to increase. An interruption or change in our relationship with ISA could have a material adverse effect on the amount of premiums we are able to write, as well as our results of operations.
 
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Federated National Holding Company

Our business could be materially and adversely affected by a security breach or other attack involving our computer systems or the systems of one or more of our business partners or vendors.

Our business requires that we build and maintain computer systems to run our operations and to store the significant volume of data that we acquire, including the personal confidential information of our customers, agents and employees and our intellectual property, trade secrets, and other sensitive business and financial information. These systems are subject to attacks by sophisticated third parties with substantial computing resources and capabilities. Such attacks may include, among other things, attempts to gain unauthorized access to this confidential or proprietary data or attempts to disrupt or shut down the system. Additionally, an employee, consultant, vendor representative or other person with legitimate access to our systems may take actions, or be the subject of a security breach or cyber attack, which could result in improper or unauthorized access to our systems, and in the loss or theft of our intellectual property or the personal information of our customers, agents or employees.
 
We undertake substantial efforts to protect our systems and sensitive or confidential information. These efforts include internal processes and technological defenses that are preventative or detective, and other controls designed to provide multiple layers of security protection. While we expend significant resources on these defensive measures, there can be no assurance that we will be successful in preventing attacks or detecting and stopping them once they have begun.
 
We also conduct significant business functions and computer operations using the systems of third-party business partners and vendors, who provide software, hosting, communication, and other computer services to us. These third-party systems may experience cyber attacks and other security breaches, which could result in the loss, theft or unauthorized publication of our information or the confidential information of our customers, agents or employees.
 
Our business could be significantly damaged by a security breach, data loss or corruption, or cyber attack. In addition to the potentially high costs of investigating and stopping such an event and implementing necessary fixes, we could incur substantial liability if confidential customer, agent or employee information is stolen. This could cause a significant disruption of our ability to conduct our insurance operations, adversely affect our competitive position if trade secrets or other proprietary information is stolen, and have severe ramifications on our reputation and brand, resulting in a materially adverse effect on our ability to generate new and renewal business. To mitigate these costs, we carry a cyber-liability insurance policy. Our insurance may not be sufficient to protect against all financial and other loss. Additionally, this policy will not afford us coverage for security breaches, data loss, or cyber attacks experienced by our third-party business partners who have access to our customer, agent, or employee data.

We rely on our information technology and telecommunications systems, and the failure of these systems could disrupt our operations.

Our business is highly dependent upon the successful and uninterrupted functioning of our current information technology and telecommunications systems. We rely on these systems to process new and renewal business, provide  customer service, make claims payments and facilitate collections and cancellations, as well as to perform actuarial and other analytical functions necessary for pricing and product development. As a result, the failure of these systems could interrupt our operations and adversely affect our financial results. We utilize a third-party to provide certain information security related services designed to prevent an information security event or detect one timely. Although we have implemented security measures to protect our systems from computer viruses and intrusions by third parties, there can be no assurances that these measures will be effective.

Nonstandard automobile insurance historically has a higher frequency of claims than standard automobile insurance, thereby increasing our potential for loss exposure beyond what we would be likely to experience if we offered only standard automobile insurance.

Nonstandard automobile insurance is provided to insureds that are unable to obtain preferred or standard insurance coverage because of their payment histories, driving records, age, vehicle types, or prior claims histories. This type of automobile insurance historically has a higher frequency of claims than does preferred or standard automobile insurance policies, although the average dollar amount of the claim is usually smaller under nonstandard insurance policies. As a result, we are exposed to the possibility of increased loss exposure and higher claims experience than would be the case if we offered only standard automobile insurance.
 
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Federated National Holding Company
 
Florida's personal injury protection insurance statute contains provisions that favor claimants, causing us to experience a higher frequency of claims than might otherwise be the case if we operated only outside of Florida.

Florida's personal injury protection insurance statute limits an insurer's ability to deny benefits for medical treatment that is unrelated to the accident, that is unnecessary, or that is fraudulent. In addition, the statute allows claimants to obtain awards for attorney's fees. Although this statute has been amended several times in recent years, primarily to address concerns over fraud, the Florida legislature has been only marginally successful in implementing effective mechanisms that allow insurers to combat fraud and other abuses. We believe that this statute contributes to a higher frequency of claims under nonstandard automobile insurance policies in Florida, as compared with claims under standard automobile insurance policies in Florida and nonstandard and standard automobile insurance policies in other states. Although we believe that we have successfully offset these higher costs with premium increases, because of competition, we may not be able to do so with as much success in the future, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

Our success depends on our ability to accurately price the risks we underwrite.

The results of operations and the financial condition of our insurance company depend on our ability to underwrite and set premium rates accurately for a wide variety of risks. Rate adequacy is necessary to generate sufficient premiums to pay losses, LAE and underwriting expenses and to earn a profit. In order to price our products accurately, we must collect and properly analyze a substantial amount of data; develop, test and apply appropriate rating formulas; closely monitor and timely recognize changes in trends; and project both severity and frequency of losses with reasonable accuracy. Our ability to undertake these efforts successfully and price our products accurately is subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, some of which are outside our control, including:
 
· the availability of sufficient reliable data and our ability to properly analyze available data;
 
· the uncertainties that inherently characterize estimates and assumptions;
 
· our selection and application of appropriate rating and pricing techniques;
 
· changes in legal standards, claim settlement practices, medical care expenses and restoration costs;
 
· regulatory restrictions; and
 
· legislatively imposed consumer initiatives.
 
Consequently, we could under-price risks, which would negatively affect our profit margins, or we could overprice risks, which could reduce our sales volume and competitiveness. In either event, the profitability of our insurance company could be materially and adversely affected.

Current operating resources are necessary to develop future new insurance products.

We currently intend to expand our product offerings by underwriting additional insurance products and programs, and marketing them through our distribution network. Expansion of our product offerings will result in increases in expenses due to additional costs incurred in actuarial rate justifications, software and personnel. Offering additional insurance products may also require regulatory approval, further increasing our costs. There can be no assurance that we will be successful bringing new insurance products to our marketplace in a manner that is profitable.

Increased competition, competitive pressures, industry developments and market conditions could affect the growth of our business and adversely impact our financial results.

We operate in highly competitive markets and face competition from national, regional and residual market insurance companies in the homeowners', commercial general liability, and automobile markets, many of whom are larger, have greater financial and other resources, have higher financial strength ratings and offer more diversified insurance coverage. Our competitors include companies that market their products through agents, as well as companies that sell insurance directly to their customers. Large national writers may have certain competitive advantages over agency writers, including increased name recognition, increased loyalty of their customer base and reduced policy acquisition costs. We may be forced to reduce our premiums significantly to compete, which could make us less profitable and have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. If we do not meet the prices offered by our competitors, we may lose business in the short term, which could also result in a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
 
- 30 -

Federated National Holding Company
 
Our ability to compete successfully in states outside of Florida and to expand our business footprint may also be negatively affected by our lack of an A. M. Best rating of our financial strength. Although our insurance subsidiary has a Demotech rating of "A" (Exceptional), which is generally accepted in Florida and certain other states, a rating by A. M. Best is more widely accepted outside of Florida and may cause customers and agents to prefer a policy written by an A. M. Best-rated company over a policy written by us. In addition, some mortgage companies outside of Florida may require homeowners to obtain property insurance from an insurance company with a minimum A. M. Best rating.

We may not obtain the necessary regulatory approvals to organize the new property and casualty insurer in Florida that is the subject of our previously announced joint venture.

On July 21, 2014, we announced that we have entered into a joint venture to form a new property and casualty insurer in Florida to be named Monarch National Insurance Company (“Monarch”). As of the date of this report, the approval of the Florida OIR is pending. We may not be able to obtain the necessary approvals and any approvals received may be subject to conditions that will make organization of a new insurer impractical. Therefore, there can be no assurances that we will be able to achieve the purpose of the joint venture.

Once Monarch is organized, we will be required to consolidate Monarch's financial results with ours. As a result, our financial results may be impacted by our percentage share of any losses that Monarch would be likely to experience in its first years of operations.

We will own approximately 42.4% of the indirect parent of Monarch (“Monarch Parent”), which, together with our expected management of Monarch's operations, will require us to consolidate Monarch Parent’s financial results with ours under generally accepted accounting principles. Monarch Parent may experience operating losses as Monarch scales up its operations. As a result, our financial results may be negatively impacted to the extent that our percentage share of any losses exceeds the income earned as a result of the managing general agent services, we expect to provide Monarch.

We anticipate that Monarch will initially focus on the Florida homeowners' insurance market, which will increase our exposure to the factors that impact the Florida insurance market generally, such as the occurrence of hurricanes, trends in claims experience, and the impact of changes in Florida insurance law and regulations.

Monarch is intended to be organized as a Florida property and casualty insurer and, once organized, will initially focus primarily on the Florida homeowners' insurance market. As a result, the presence of Monarch in the Florida market will increase our exposure to the factors that impact insurers in the Florida market generally, such as the occurrence of catastrophic events such as hurricanes, the trends experienced in administering and resolving claims resulting from the increased use of private adjusters, and the impact of changes in Florida's insurance laws and regulations. To the extent that these factors may adversely affect our operations, the presence of Monarch in the Florida market will have the effect of magnifying the effect of those factors.

It is intended that Monarch will write insurance policies that will have a higher risk profile than those written by FNIC, allowing Monarch to reach a broader market and charge higher premiums. While Monarch's underwriting standards will avoid the highest risk policies, the occurrence of a catastrophic event could result in greater losses per policy for Monarch and have a material adverse effect on the Company’s results of operations, financial position and cash flows.

Our participation in the Florida Property Insurance Clearinghouse may not result in an increase in our premium revenue.

Pursuant to legislation passed by the Florida legislature in 2013 intended to reduce the insurance policy count of Citizens, a Florida not-for-profit, tax-exempt government corporation, the Property Insurance Clearinghouse (the “Clearinghouse”) launched in January 2014. This allows all potentially new and renewal policies of Citizens to be comparatively shopped by participating private market insurers before becoming, or remaining, policies of Citizens. We intend to be a participating insurance company in the Clearinghouse.

Applications to Citizens for new homeowners' policies and existing policies with Citizens up for renewal are submitted to insurance companies participating in the Clearinghouse. If that process identifies a carrier willing to write a new policy at a premium that is no more than 15% higher than Citizens' premium of comparable coverage or, in the case of a renewal, with a premium equal to or less than the policy's renewal premium with Citizens, then that homeowner is ineligible for coverage with Citizens. The homeowner may then choose to have an agent bind coverage with the homeowner's choice of the private market insurers that have made the homeowner a qualifying offer of coverage.
 
- 31 -

Federated National Holding Company

There can be no assurance that our policy count or gross premiums will increase as a result of our participation in the Clearinghouse, because our premiums may not be below the threshold required by Citizens, other carriers participating in the Clearinghouse may be willing to offer similar policies for lower premiums, or we may decide to not provide a quote on these policies if they do not meet our underwriting guidelines.

Our senior management team is critical to the strategic direction of our company. If there were an unplanned loss of service by any of our officers our business could be harmed.

We depend, and will continue to depend, on the services of our executive management team which includes Michael H. Braun, Chief Executive Officer and President and Peter J. Prygelski III, our Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer. Our success also will depend in part upon our ability to attract and retain qualified executive officers, experienced underwriting talent and other skilled employees who are knowledgeable about our business. If we were to lose the services of one or more members of our executive management team, our business could be adversely affected. Although we have employment agreements with our executive officers, any unplanned loss of service could substantially harm our business.

We are subject to extensive regulation and potential further restrictive regulation may increase our operating costs and limit our growth.

As an insurance company, we are subject to extensive laws and regulations. These laws and regulations are complex and subject to change. Moreover, they are administered and enforced by a number of different governmental authorities, including state insurance regulators, state securities administrators, the SEC, the U.S. Department of Justice, and state attorneys general, each of which exercises a degree of interpretive latitude. Consequently, we are subject to the risk that compliance with any particular regulator’s or enforcement authority’s interpretation of a legal issue may not result in compliance with another’s interpretation of the same issue, particularly when compliance is judged in hindsight. In addition, there is risk that any particular regulator’s or enforcement authority’s interpretation of a legal issue may change over time to our detriment, or that changes in the overall legal environment may, even absent any particular regulator’s or enforcement authority’s interpretation of a legal issue changing, cause us to change our views regarding the actions we need to take from a legal risk management perspective, thus necessitating changes to our practices that may, in some cases, limit our ability to grow and improve the profitability of our business. Furthermore, in some cases, these laws and regulations are designed to protect or benefit the interests of a specific constituency rather than a range of constituencies. For example, state insurance laws and regulations are generally intended to protect or benefit purchasers or users of insurance products, not holders of securities issued by us. In many respects, these laws and regulations limit our ability to grow and improve the profitability of our business.

In recent years, the state insurance regulatory framework has come under public scrutiny and members of Congress have discussed proposals to provide for federal chartering of insurance companies. We can make no assurances regarding the potential impact of state or federal measures that may change the nature or scope of insurance regulation.

New homeowners’ insurance operations outside of the State of Florida may not be profitable.

We plan to continue the expansion of admitted homeowners’ property and casualty programs into other states as opportunities avail themselves. Risks associated with execution of our planned operations include the inability to market an adequately priced policy, inadequate commission structures, and overpriced or unavailable catastrophic reinsurance for wind events. Additionally, each state has its own authoritative body designed to regulate the insurance products and operations of new and existing insurance companies under their respective authority. For example, during 2013 FNIC obtained regulatory approval to initiate a new homeowners’ property and casualty program in the State of Louisiana.

There can be no guarantees that our operations will be profitable in a given state nor can there be any guarantees that the state authorities will allow us to do business in that state.

We face risks in connection with potential material weakness resulting from our Sarbanes-Oxley Section 404 management report and any related remedial measures that we undertake.

In conjunction with our ongoing reporting obligations as a public company and the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, management reported on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2014. In order to identify any material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, we engaged in a process to document, evaluate and test our internal controls and procedures, including corrections to existing controls and implement additional controls and procedures that we may deem necessary. As a result of this evaluation and testing process, no material financial reporting deficiencies were noted.
 
- 32 -

Federated National Holding Company
 
Although we did not have any material weaknesses in our internal controls for our fiscal year ended December 31, 2014, we cannot be certain that there will be none in the future. In future periods, if the process required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act reveals significant deficiencies or material weaknesses, the correction of any such significant deficiencies or material weaknesses could require additional remedial measures that could be costly and time-consuming. In addition, the discovery of material weaknesses could also require the restatement of prior period operating results. If a material weakness exists as of a future period year-end (including a material weakness identified prior to year-end for which there is an insufficient period of time to evaluate and confirm the effectiveness of the corrections or related new procedures), our management will be unable to report favorably as of such future period year-end as to the effectiveness of our control over financial reporting and we could lose investor confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports, which could have an adverse effect on our stock price and potentially subject us to litigation.

Risks Related to an Investment in Our Shares

Our stock price in recent years has been volatile and is likely to continue to be volatile. As a result, the market price of our common stock may drop below the price you pay, and you may not be able to resell your shares at a profit.

The market price of our common stock has experienced, and may continue to experience, significant volatility from time to time. Such volatility may be affected by various factors and events, such as:

·
our quarterly operating results, including a shortfall in operating revenue or net income from that expected by securities analysts and investors;

·
recognition of large unanticipated accounting charges, such as related to a loss reserve enhancement;

·
changes in securities analysts’ estimates of our financial performance or the financial performance of our competitors or companies in our industry generally;

·
the announcement of a material event or anticipated event involving us or our industry or the markets in which we operate;

·
the issuance of a significant number of shares; and

·
the other risk factors described in this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus and the documents incorporated by reference herein.

In recent years, the U.S. stock market has experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations, which have sometimes affected the market price of the securities issued by a particular company in a manner unrelated to the operational performance of the company. This type of market effect could impact our common stock price as well. The volatility of our common stock means that the price of our common stock may have declined substantially at such time as you may look to sell your shares of our common stock. If our share price decreases, the value of your investment could decline.

If we report a material weakness in our internal controls and procedures, we may lose investor confidence and remedial measures may be costly.

In accordance with applicable law, we are required to document, evaluate and test our internal controls and procedures, including corrections to existing controls and implement additional controls and procedures that we may deem necessary, and to identify and report any material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting. As a result of this evaluation and testing process, no material weakness was identified or reported as of December 31, 2014.  In fixture periods, if the process required by law reveals significant deficiencies or material weaknesses, the correction of any such significant deficiencies or material weaknesses could require additional remedial measures that could be costly and time consuming. In addition, the discovery of material weaknesses could also require the restatement of prior period operating results. If a material weakness exists and is reported as of a future period year-end (including a material weakness identified prior to year-end for which there is an insufficient period of time to evaluate and confirm the effectiveness of the corrections or related new procedures), we could lose investor confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports, which could have an adverse effect on our stock price and potentially subject us to litigation.

No system of internal control over financial reporting will prevent all errors and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the control systems objectives will be met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the controls. Over time, controls may become inadequate because changes in conditions or deterioration in the degree of compliance with policies or procedures may occur. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected. As a result, we cannot assure you that significant deficiencies or material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting will be identified in the future.
 
- 33 -

Federated National Holding Company

Our controls and procedures may fail or be circumvented which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We regularly review and update our internal controls, disclosure controls and procedures, and corporate governance policies and procedures. Any system of controls, however well designed and operated, is based in part on certain assumptions and can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurances that the objectives of the system are met. Any failure or circumvention of our controls and procedures or failure to comply with regulations related to controls and procedures could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We have authorized but unissued preferred stock, which could affect rights of holders of common stock.

Our articles of incorporation authorize the issuance of preferred stock with designations, rights and preferences determined from time to time by our board of directors. Accordingly, our board of directors is empowered, without shareholder approval, to issue preferred stock with dividends, liquidation, conversion, voting or other rights that could adversely affect the voting power or other rights of the holders of common stock. In addition, the preferred stock could be issued as a method of discouraging a takeover attempt. Although we do not intend to issue any preferred stock at this time, we may do so in the future.

Provisions in our articles of incorporation and our bylaws, as amended, and the Florida Business Corporation Act could make it more difficult to acquire us and may reduce the market price of our common stock.

Our articles of incorporation and our bylaws presently contain certain provisions which may make it more difficult and time-consuming for shareholders or third parties to influence our management, policies or affairs, and may discourage, delay or prevent a transaction involving a change-in-control of the Company and offering a premium over the current market price of our common stock. These provisions include those which:

·
prohibit cumulative voting in the election of our directors,

·
establish a classified board of directors with staggered three-year terms,

·
provide that the written request of shareholders holding not less than one-third of all votes entitled to be cast on an issue is required for shareholders to call special meetings of our shareholders,

·
establish advance notice and disclosure procedures for shareholders to bring matters, including nominations for election to our board, before a meeting of our shareholders, and

·
eliminate the ability of shareholders to take action by written consent in lieu of a shareholder meeting.

As a result, we may be less likely to receive unsolicited offers to acquire us that some of our shareholders might consider beneficial.

The Florida Business Corporation Act, as amended, contains provisions, which our directors have elected not to opt out of, that are designed to enhance the ability of our board to respond to and potentially defer attempts to acquire control of the Company. These provisions may discourage altogether takeover attempts that have not been approved by our board. These provisions may also adversely affect the price that a potential purchaser would be willing to pay for our common stock and, therefore, deprive you of the opportunity to obtain a takeover premium for your shares. These provisions could make the removal of our incumbent directors and management more difficult. These provisions may enable a minority of our directors and the holders of a minority of our outstanding voting stock or the holders of an existing control block to prevent, delay, discourage or make more difficult a merger, tender offer or proxy contest, even though the transaction may be favorable to the interests of a majority of our non-affiliate shareholders. These provisions could also potentially adversely affect the market price of our common stock.
 
- 34 -

Federated National Holding Company

 
As a holding company, we depend on the earnings of our subsidiaries and their ability to pay management fees and dividends to the holding company as the primary source of our income.

We are an insurance holding company whose primary assets are the stock of our subsidiaries. Our operations, and our ability to pay dividends or service future potential debt, are limited by the earnings of our subsidiaries and their payment of their earnings to us in the form of management fees, commissions, dividends, loans, advances or the reimbursement of expenses. These payments can be made only when our subsidiaries have adequate earnings. In addition, dividend payments made to us by our insurance subsidiary are restricted by Florida law governing the insurance industry. Generally, Florida law limits the dividends payable by insurance companies under complicated formulas based on the subsidiary's available capital and earnings.

Payment of dividends in the future will depend on our earnings and financial position and such other factors, as our Board of Directors deems relevant. Moreover, our ability to continue to pay dividends may be restricted by regulatory limits on the amount of dividends that FNIC is permitted to pay to the parent company.

Future sales of our common stock may depress our stock price.

Sales of a substantial number of shares of our common stock in the public market or otherwise, by us or by a major shareholder, could depress the market price of our common stock and impair our ability to raise capital through the sale of additional equity securities.

In addition, we may issue additional shares of our common stock from time to time in the future in amounts that may be significant. The sale of substantial amounts of our common stock, or the perception that these sales may occur, could adversely impact our stock price.

As of December 31, 2014, there were 151,585 shares issuable upon the exercise of outstanding and exercisable stock options, 67,700 shares issuable upon the exercise of outstanding stock options that are unvested and 750,500 additional shares available for grant under our equity-based compensation plans. The market price of the common shares may be depressed by the potential exercise of these options or grant of these shares. The holders of these options are likely to exercise them when we would otherwise be able to obtain additional capital on more favorable terms than those provided by the options.

ITEM 1B
UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None

ITEM 2
PROPERTIES

Our executive offices are now located at 14050 N.W. 14th Street, Suite 180, Sunrise, Florida 33323 in an 18,500 square foot office facility and our telephone number is (800) 293-2532. During March 2014, we extended our lease term to expire in August 2019 and expanded the leased premises to include an additional 13,642 square feet. All of our operations are consolidated within this facility. We believe that the facilities are well maintained, in substantial compliance with environmental laws and regulations, and adequately covered by insurance. We also believe that these leased facilities are not unique and could be replaced, if necessary, at the end of the lease term.

ITEM 3 
LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

See Item 8 of Part II, “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data – Footnote 9 – Commitments and Contingencies”.

ITEM 4
MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.
 
- 35 -

Federated National Holding Company
 
PART II

ITEM 5
MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Our common stock is listed for trading on The NASDAQ Global Market under the symbol “FNHC”. The following table sets out the high and low closing sale prices as reported on The NASDAQ Global Market. These reported prices reflect inter-dealer prices without adjustments for retail markups, markdowns or commissions.

Quarter Ended
 
High
   
Low
 
March 31, 2014
 
$
18.40
   
$
12.17
 
June 30, 2014
 
$
26.60
   
$
18.02
 
September 30, 2014
 
$
28.22
   
$
19.70
 
December 31, 2014
 
$
37.04
   
$
23.60
 
                 
March 31, 2013
 
$
7.90
   
$
5.35
 
June 30, 2013
 
$
10.41
   
$
7.05
 
September 30, 2013
 
$
10.89
   
$
8.43
 
December 31, 2013
 
$
14.90
   
$
9.80
 

As of March 2, 2015, there were 55 holders of record of our common stock. We believe that the number of beneficial owners of our common stock is in excess of 6,250.

DIVIDENDS

The Board of Directors of FNHC declared regular quarterly dividends as follows:

· $0.04 per common share payable on March 2, 2015 to shareholders of record as of February 2, 2015;

· $0.03 per common share payable on June 2, September 2 and December 1, 2014 to shareholders of record as of May 5, August 4 and November 3, 2014;

· $0.03 per common share payable on September 3 and December 2, 2013 and March 3, 2014 to shareholders of record as of August 5 and November 4, 2013 and February 3, 2014;

· $0.02 per common share payable on December 28, 2012 and March 4, 2013 to shareholders of record as of December 3, 2012 and February 4, 2013.

Payment of dividends in the future will depend on our earnings and financial position and such other factors, as our Board of Directors deems relevant. Moreover, our ability to continue to pay dividends may be restricted by regulatory limits on the amount of dividends that FNIC is permitted to pay to the parent company.
 
Federated National Holding Company
 
SECURITIES AUTHORIZED FOR ISSUANCE UNDER EQUITY COMPENSATION PLANS

The following table summarizes our equity compensation plans as of December 31, 2014. All equity compensation plans were approved by our shareholders. We have not granted any options, warrants or rights to our shareholders outside of these equity compensation plans.

Equity Compensation Plan Information
 
Plan category
 
Number of securities to
be issued upon exercise of
outstanding options,
warrants and rights
   
Weighted-average
exercise price of
outstanding options,
warrants and rights
   
Number of securities
remaining available for
future issuance under
equity compensation plans
(excluding securities
reflected in column (a))
 
 
(a)
   
(b)
   
(c)
 
Equity compensation plans approved by stock holders*
   
667,086
     
12.55
     
750,500
 
 
  *   Includes the 1998 and 2002 Stock Option Plans and the 2012 Stock Incentive Plan.

For additional information concerning our capitalization please see Footnote 14 to our Consolidated Financial Statements included under Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
ISSUER REPURCHASES
    
During 2014 and 2013, the Company did not repurchase any common stock under previously announced stock repurchase plans.

SALES OF UNREGISTERED SECURITIES

None.
 
Federated National Holding Company
 
STOCK PERFORMANCE GRAPH

The following graph shows the cumulative total shareholder return on our common stock over the last five fiscal years as compared with the total returns of the NASDAQ Composite Index and the SNL Property & Casualty Insurance Index. In accordance with SEC rules, this graph includes indices that we believe are comparable and appropriate.
 
 
Federated National Holding Company
 

 
   
Period Ending
 
Index
 
12/31/09
   
12/31/10
   
12/31/11
   
12/31/12
   
12/31/13
   
12/31/14
 
Federated National Holding Company
   
100.00
     
81.60
     
75.95
     
137.77
     
382.67
     
634.22
 
NASDAQ Composite
   
100.00
     
118.15
     
117.22
     
138.02
     
193.47
     
222.16
 
SNL Insurance P&C
   
100.00
     
119.24
     
120.55
     
142.31
     
188.53
     
216.52
 

Source : SNL Financial LC, Charlottesville, VA
© 2015
www.snl.com

Returns are based on the change in year-end to year-end price. The graph assumes $100 was invested on December 31, 2009 in our common stock, the NASDAQ Composite Index and the SNL Property & Casualty Insurance Index and that all dividends were reinvested. Past performance is not necessarily an indicator of future results.

Our filings with the SEC may incorporate information by reference, including this Form 10-K.  Unless we specifically state otherwise, the information under this heading "Stock Performance Graph" shall not be deemed to be "soliciting materials" and shall not be deemed to be "filed" with the SEC or incorporated by reference into any of our filings under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
 
Federated National Holding Company

ITEM 6 SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The following selected consolidated financial data should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” appearing elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

   
As of the Years Ended December 31,
 
    (Amounts in Thousands except Book Value Per Share)  
                     
   
2014
   
2013
   
2012
   
2011
   
2010
 
Balance Sheet Data
                   
     
Assets:
                   
Cash and investments
 
$
370,920
   
$
262,156
   
$
151,238
   
$
144,672
   
$
138,691
 
Total assets
   
503,631
     
316,741
     
185,888
     
179,980
     
184,049
 
                                         
Liabilities:
                                       
Unpaid losses and LAE
   
78,330
     
61,016
     
49,908
     
59,983
     
66,529
 
Unearned premiums
   
192,424
     
128,343
     
59,006
     
47,933
     
47,136
 
Total liabilities
   
311,052
     
208,247
     
119,983
     
121,836
     
126,118
 
                                         
Total shareholders' equity
   
192,579
     
108,494
     
65,905
     
58,144
     
57,931
 
                                         
Book value per share
 
$
14.13
   
$
9.95
   
$
8.26
   
$
7.32
   
$
7.29
 
                                         
Statutory surplus
   
125,330
     
76,889
     
52,012
     
39,307
     
40,603
 
 
Federated National Holding Company

    Years Ended December 31,  
    (Amounts in Thousands except EPS and Dividends)      
                     
   
2014
   
2013
   
2012
   
2011
   
2010
 
Operations Data:
                   
Revenue:
                   
Gross premiums written
 
$
377,156
   
$
243,373
   
$
119,459
   
$
98,269
   
$
96,410
 
Gross premiums ceded
   
(201,998
)
   
(82,708
)
   
(51,085
)
   
(46,293
)
   
(52,963
)
                                         
Net premiums written
   
175,158
     
160,665
     
68,374
     
51,976
     
43,447
 
                                         
Increase (decrease) in prepaid reinsurance premiums
   
59,828
     
13,052
     
2,059
     
(2,656
)
   
(2,108
)
(Increase) decrease in unearned premiums
   
(64,081
)
   
(69,336
)
   
(11,074
)
   
(797
)
   
3,721
 
                                         
Net change in prepaid reinsurance premiums and unearned premiums
   
(4,253
)
   
(56,284
)
   
(9,015
)
   
(3,453
)
   
1,613
 
                                         
Net premiums earned
   
170,905
     
104,381
     
59,359